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Mt Strzelecki walk back on track

28/06/2019

Flinders Island's Mt Strzelecki walking track has received an upgrade which will improve the experience for walkers and visitors, as well as environmental management.More

New car park for Ben Lomond National Park

28/06/2019

A new visitor carpark is now complete at Ben Lomond National Park. The car park will be opened to visitors and fully operational in the coming weeks in time for this winter's first major snow fall.More

Planned burn success on Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area sites

28/06/2019

The Tasmania Wilderness World Heritage Area experienced significant wildfire events between January and March this year, yet there are still areas that require pro-active fire management for the protection and conservation of the area's values.More

Summary of Draft Overland Track Recreation Zone Plan 2006

The full version of the Draft Overland Track Recreation Zone Plan 2006 can be downloaded as a PDF File (4100 Kb).

Summary

The Overland Track starts in Cradle Valley in the northern tip of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, and traverses the Cradle Mountain—Lake St Clair National Park southwards to Lake St Clair, near Derwent Bridge. The Overland Track has become Tasmania’s premier long-distance walking track and has a significant national and international profile. It has become an icon as one of the most popular overnight bushwalks in Australia, and is the best known of Tasmania’s overnight bushwalks.

Details of the number of walkers on the Overland have been collected since the early 1970s. At this time, it was estimated approximately 1,500 walkers per annum were undertaking the Overland. This figure has generally increased, over time and in 2004-05, it is estimated that 8,800 walkers completed the journey (PWS 2005).

This increasing trend in walkers contrasts with a decline in other overnight recreational activities elsewhere in the WHA (PWS 2005). Approximately 90% of walkers on the Overland Track are from interstate or overseas. In the past, planning for the Overland Track was largely on an ad-hoc reactive basis to address specific management or operational issues. There was little strategic recreation planning to guide the whole Overland experience. The application of different standards and approaches over time has resulted in a mix of infrastructure that is unsympathetic to the overall experience and to the environment in which it is sited.

This Recreation Zone Plan aims to provide a basis for the planning and management of the Overland Track over the next 10 years. The development of the plan has been informed by the Vision for the Overland Track 2004 , and the Overland Track Site Strategy Report 2005.