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Lookout at Bruny Island Neck reopens

12/11/2018

Bruny Island is one of Tasmania's most loved tourism destinations, and the upgrade of vital infrastructure will ensure it can reach its full tourism potential.More

History unlocked at Richmond Gaol

12/11/2018

Investment in the restoration of the Gaoler's House at Richmond Gaol will enhance the visitor experience at one of Tasmania's key historic sites.More

Campfire restrictions in national parks and reserves

09/11/2018

Restrictions on campfires, pot fires and other solid fuel stoves will come in to place from next Wednesday (November 14) at identified Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) campgrounds around the State to help reduce the risk of bushfires.More

Forty-Spotted Pardalote, Pardalotus quadragintus

40-spotted pardalote

Forty-spotted pardalote
(Photo by Dave Watts)

Description

One of the smallest birds in Australia, the endemic Forty-spotted Pardalote is threatened with extinction. For full details of its plight, see our threatened species pages.

The Forty-spotted Pardalote belongs to a group known as 'diamond birds' because of their tiny, jewel-like appearance. Measuring about 90 - 100 mm, the body is light olive green with pale yellow around the eye and on the rump. The wings are black with distinctive white dots. Unlike its close relative, the spotted pardalote, there are no head markings.

Habitat

Forty-spotted Pardalotes live in dry eucalypt forests and woodlands only where white gum (Eucalyptus viminalis) occurs.

The species can sometimes be seen at Maria Island National Park, the Labillardiere Peninsula in South Bruny National Park and the Peter Murrell Reserve near Kingston.

Diet

They feed on a variety of insects, and also lerps (a protective insect coating) and manna, a sugary secretion produced by the tree in response to insect attack. The birds are called 'foliage gleaners' because of the way they pick the insects from the leaves and branches.

Breeding

The nest is  built of fine bark and usually placed in the hollow of a mature tree. Four white, lustrous eggs are laid.

Call

The call is a low pitched 'where... where... where... where'.

Distribution Map courtesy Natural Values Atlas, data from theLIST
© 2010 State of Tasmania

Distribution

The rare and threatened Forty-spotted Pardalote is found in suitable habitat in a few, scattered eastern and southern localities, including Maria Island, Bruny Island, Tinderbox and Flinders Island.