Our Latest News

Lookout at Bruny Island Neck reopens

12/11/2018

Bruny Island is one of Tasmania's most loved tourism destinations, and the upgrade of vital infrastructure will ensure it can reach its full tourism potential.More

History unlocked at Richmond Gaol

12/11/2018

Investment in the restoration of the Gaoler's House at Richmond Gaol will enhance the visitor experience at one of Tasmania's key historic sites.More

Campfire restrictions in national parks and reserves

09/11/2018

Restrictions on campfires, pot fires and other solid fuel stoves will come in to place from next Wednesday (November 14) at identified Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) campgrounds around the State to help reduce the risk of bushfires.More

Liffey Falls State Reserve

Introduction

Liffey Falls

Liffey Falls framed by myrtle-beech
(Photo by Steve Johnson)

It is a matter of considerable argument among Tasmanians as to which is the prettiest waterfall in their State - Russell Falls or Liffey Falls?

Liffey Falls State Reserve is nestled within cool temperate rainforest on the slopes of the Great Western Tiers. Framed by the dominant species of Tasmania's cool temperate rainforests - myrtle, sassafrass and leatherwood, the falls are understandably a popular spot among both Tasmanians and visitors alike. A nature walk leads from a picnic area near the carpark down through forests of towering eucalypts and tree ferns to the falls. A number of smaller falls are passed along the way.

The Liffey Falls State Reserve was included within the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area in 1989, a tribute to the globally significant value of the region. The area reveals a rich human heritage and insights into the forces which shaped the landscape over the past 250 million years.

A picnic area lies within the upper part of the reserve. The road between the Upper Liffey Falls Picnic Area and the Lower Liffey Campground is a steep, slippery gravel road. it is not suitable for large vehicles, caravans or buses.