Our Latest News

History unlocked at Richmond Gaol

12/11/2018

Investment in the restoration of the Gaoler's House at Richmond Gaol will enhance the visitor experience at one of Tasmania's key historic sites.More

Campfire restrictions in national parks and reserves

09/11/2018

Restrictions on campfires, pot fires and other solid fuel stoves will come in to place from next Wednesday (November 14) at identified Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) campgrounds around the State to help reduce the risk of bushfires.More

Godfreys Beach penguin viewing platform open

07/11/2018

The development of a new penguin viewing platform at Godfreys Beach at The Nut State Reserve in Stanley has recently been completed by the Parks and Wildlife Service.More

Southwest National Park

Highlights

The rugged peaks of the Southwest

The rugged peaks of the south-west

The Southwest National Park is the largest in Tasmania. A region of wild rivers and jagged mountain ranges, rolling buttongrass plains and silent, green rainforests, the southwest encompasses some of the finest wilderness country in Australia, and indeed is among the last remaining temperate wilderness areas on Earth.

The drive along the Gordon River Road to Strathgordon is nothing short of spectacular. The greatest asset of this national park is the sheer scale of its wilderness regions. On a fine day, a drive along this road will be a memorable experience.

Some of the best fishing in Australia can be found in the Southwest National Park, while bushwalkers will find some of Australia's premier wilderness walks, including the South Coast and Port Davey Tracks. There is also a range of less demanding walks, including the popular Creep Crawly Trail.

Mt Rugby

Photographing the rugged
mountains of the southwest

The Bathurst Harbour - Port Davey region is an excellent example of a drowned river valley. Beneath the waters of Bathurst Channel lives a range of fascinating marine species, such as sea pens. These animals are usually found in much deeper water. In the Channel, the dark, tannin-stained water allows the sea pens to thrive in very shallow water.

The area is also the sole breeding grounds of the highly endangered orange-bellied parrot. Visitors to Melaleuca can see these beautifully coloured parrots at the Bird Hide.