Our Latest News

Mt Strzelecki walk back on track

28/06/2019

Flinders Island's Mt Strzelecki walking track has received an upgrade which will improve the experience for walkers and visitors, as well as environmental management.More

New car park for Ben Lomond National Park

28/06/2019

A new visitor carpark is now complete at Ben Lomond National Park. The car park will be opened to visitors and fully operational in the coming weeks in time for this winter's first major snow fall.More

Planned burn success on Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area sites

28/06/2019

The Tasmania Wilderness World Heritage Area experienced significant wildfire events between January and March this year, yet there are still areas that require pro-active fire management for the protection and conservation of the area's values.More

Mt Field National Park

Introduction

Mt Field Icon

Mt Field National Park is one of Tasmania's most loved national parks. The park has a wide variety of scenic features and wildlife and offers a great range of facilities for day visitors. Few other national parks in Australia offer such a diversity in vegetation, ranging from tall swamp gum forests and massive tree ferns at the base of the mountain, through rainforest along the Lake Dobson Road, to alpine vegetation at the higher elevations.

 The park essentially has two visitor sections. The first, near the park entrance, includes picnic facilities and the famous Russell Falls. Stunning walks through enormous fern forests and some of the tallest trees in the world are available in this area.

The second visitor section is centred at Lake Dobson and includes the long day walks and skiing areas.

For all snow and Lake Dobson Road closure or condition advisories, please contact the Mt Field Visitor Centre: phone 03 6288 1149.

For the latest snow reports during the ski season, see the Mt Mawson Snow Cam. Dramatic mountain scenery and alpine plant communities are a feature of the higher parts of the park.

Following the 2013 extension, the Mt Field National Park now forms part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.