Our Latest News

Fly Neighbourly Advice for the Tasman National Park

24/08/2019

Public comment is invited on the draft Tasman National Park Fly Neighbourly Advice. The draft Fly Neighbourly Advice has been prepared by the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service in response to increasing air traffic over the Tasman National Park.More

Hybrid diesel-electric shuttle buses at Cradle Mountain - a first for National p

19/08/2019

When you next visit Cradle Mountain you will be able to step aboard one of the new hybrid, diesel-electric, shuttle buses on your trip to Dove Lake. These new buses will reduce emissions and deliver a quieter, all mobility friendly, visitor experience.More

AFAC Independent Operational Review of the 2018-19 bushfires

08/08/2019

Following the 2018-19 bushfires the Tasmanian Government commissioned an independent report by the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Council to review the overall response and identify areas where more can be done to improve the State's response andMore

Kent Group National Park

Activities

The Kent Group of Islands is located in a very remote and isolated area of Bass Strait. The islands have been reserved for the protection of their unique marine and land ecosystems. Facilities are therefore very limited. Visitors must be self-sufficient, as there are no shops on the Islands. The islands do not offer any formed walking tracks or public amenities.

Camping on the islands is limited, with some areas being restricted due to their cultural significance. The islands' ecosystems are very fragile and it is imperative that minimal impact camping methods are used in all situations.

There are no established campsites on the islands, although there is a small hut located at West Cove on Erith Island. This hut is of historical significance and should only be used in the case of an emergency.

The islands have long been recognised by sailors and fisher-folk alike for their safe anchorages when bad weather sets in.


The islands offer some spectacular scenery that is best observed from the water. Sea kyaking is a popular way to explore around the islands, however accessing the islands by sea kayak is a major undertaking and is only suitable for highly skilled and experienced sea kayakers.

The islands were originally of interest to settlers due to the large Australian fur seal colonies. Thus, there is the ever-present spectacle of seals in their natural environment, although, of course, in greatly reduced numbers than was the case when settlers first arrived on the islands. It is advised that the seals be observed from a distance by boat. It is important not to approach within 100 metres during the breeding season November to December. See our Seal Watching Guidelines for futher details.

There is also great opportunities for diving in the protected bays and coves around the islands, although swimming and diving within the seal colonies is not advised as where there are seals there are sharks!