Our Latest News

Fly Neighbourly Advice for the Tasman National Park

24/08/2019

Public comment is invited on the draft Tasman National Park Fly Neighbourly Advice. The draft Fly Neighbourly Advice has been prepared by the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service in response to increasing air traffic over the Tasman National Park.More

Hybrid diesel-electric shuttle buses at Cradle Mountain - a first for National p

19/08/2019

When you next visit Cradle Mountain you will be able to step aboard one of the new hybrid, diesel-electric, shuttle buses on your trip to Dove Lake. These new buses will reduce emissions and deliver a quieter, all mobility friendly, visitor experience.More

AFAC Independent Operational Review of the 2018-19 bushfires

08/08/2019

Following the 2018-19 bushfires the Tasmanian Government commissioned an independent report by the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Council to review the overall response and identify areas where more can be done to improve the State's response andMore

Kelly Basin

25. Kelly Basin

time 3 - 4 hour return (5.4km one way)
access Final 5km of access road is four-wheel-drive only. In Queenstown, turn left at the Empire Hotel and then first right into Conlan Street.  Continue along Conlan Street which will lead you out of Queenstown and onto the Mt Jukes Road. Continue on this road for about 30 minutes until the right hand turn to the Bird River walking track. See map
facilities Picnic tables near the start of the track. No toilets. Full facilities in Queenstown and Strahan.
grade Level 3 Some sections are wet and muddy underfoot.
what to take Group C items
cautions Supervise children, weather may change quickly
prohibited Pets, firearms or bicycles are not allowed

Walk with history down the route of the former railway line to Kelly Basin. Where once 1000 people lived, today only historic remnants of the former town of Pillinger can be seen amidst lush green mosses and tree ferns.

Highlights

Standing in East Pillinger in the very early 1900s you would have been in the midst of a bustling port town. Railway carriages loaded with timber, bricks and ore would be shunting past, the sound of shouted instructions ringing out and the smell of wood-smoke hanging thickly in the air.

Today, most of the town has been reclaimed by the forest. There are however some substantial and fascinating relics awaiting your discovery. A full history of Pillinger is available on our web site.

This area is part of the Macquarie Harbour Historic Site and within the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.