Our Latest News

Mt Strzelecki walk back on track

28/06/2019

Flinders Island's Mt Strzelecki walking track has received an upgrade which will improve the experience for walkers and visitors, as well as environmental management.More

New car park for Ben Lomond National Park

28/06/2019

A new visitor carpark is now complete at Ben Lomond National Park. The car park will be opened to visitors and fully operational in the coming weeks in time for this winter's first major snow fall.More

Planned burn success on Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area sites

28/06/2019

The Tasmania Wilderness World Heritage Area experienced significant wildfire events between January and March this year, yet there are still areas that require pro-active fire management for the protection and conservation of the area's values.More

Duck Reach

40. Duck Reach

time 1.5 hour return walk (3km one way)
access Park in Basin Road, West Launceston. Then follow the path into the Cataract Gorge grounds where you’ll find the Great Short Walks sign. Alternatively, you can walk to the Gorge from the Kings Bridge (near the Penny Royal complex) and join the Duck Reach track at the suspension bridge in the Gorge grounds. Allow 20 minutes to walk to the Duck Reach track from Kings Bridge. See map
facilities
Toilets, picnic facilities, kiosk, drinking water, swimming pool and change rooms in the Cataract Gorge ground
grade Level 3. There are some short uphill sections and approximately 190 steps each way. (The walk can be done one way if you arrange to have a car collect you from the track exit at Corin Street, above Duck Reach.)
what to take Group A items
cautions Supervise children, hazardous cliffs, unprotected track edges, flowing waters
prohibited Pets, bicycles and skateboards are not permitted.

Follow the South Esk River from Launceston’s famous Cataract Gorge to the historic Duck Reach power station. This walk will generally suit groups with children.

Highlights

Work on the Duck Reach Power Station began in 1855 but it wasn't until 1895 that the turbines began to power the new electric streetlights.

The station was destroyed by floods in 1929 and rebuilt the following year. It continued to operate until 1956. Today an interpretation centre provides a history of the station.