Our Latest News

Hartz Peak Track Closed

21/01/2019

PWS advises that the Hartz Peak Track in Hartz Mountains National Park has been closed until further notice due to increased fire risk.More

PWS Campfire restrictions extended statewide

21/01/2019

The Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) is extending the current campfire restrictions statewide until further notice.More

PWS Fire update

20/01/2019

There are many fires currently burning in national parks and reserves in Tasmania, including the Southwest National Park and Southwest Conservation Area.More

Liffey Falls

42. Liffey Falls

time 45 minutes return (1km one way)
access
Road C513. Approach from Bracknell, Deloraine or Great Lake. See map
facilities Gas barbecues, picnic shelters, toilets and drinking water
grade Level 2
what to take Group A items
cautions Supervise children, weather may change quickly, flowing waters
prohibited Pets, firearms or bicycles are not allowed.
Access road is not suitable for buses and caravans

There are two walking tracks to Liffey Falls.  The walk described here is from the top car park where there are developed picnic facilities and a shorter, and higher grade walking track.  An alternative track is from the lower car park where there are minimal facilities and a longer and lesser grade walking track.  The lower car park may be accessed by buses and caravans.

Liffey Falls is within the Liffey Falls State Reserve.

Highlights

Water collected on the Great Western Tiers washes into the Liffey River. As it rushes downslope it erodes away the softer mudstone sediments exposing sandstone steps. These give rise to a series of waterfalls culminating in Liffey Falls.

The exposed sandstone was laid down over 250 million years ago when this region lay further south, covered by sea and ice. As icebergs melted, rocks were freed and plunged as 'dropstones' into the marine sediments below. These embedded dropstones, which are paler, roundish and flattened in shape, can be seen in the river along the track to Liffey Falls. Made of quartzite, these dropstones may have come from as far away as Cradle Mountain! Also embedded in the rocks exposed by the erosive force of the Liffey River are tiny marine fossils.