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Tarkine Drive visitor facility upgrades

17/09/2018

A tender has been advertised for upgrades to visitor sites on the Tarkine Drive.More

New improved Fortescue Bay boat ramp

14/09/2018

Work has been completed on a major upgrade of the Fortescue Bay boat ramp on the Tasman Peninsula.More

Next steps on the new Cradle Mountain visitor experience

10/09/2018

A key milestone has been reached in the project to transform Cradle Mountain into a new world-class experience with the release of the Dove Lake Viewing Shelter Development Proposal and Environmental Impact Statement (DPEIS) for public comment.More

Scrubtit, Acanthornis magnus

ScrubtitScrubtit (Photograph by Dave Watts)

Although common, the endemic Scrubtit is often difficult to see due to its secretive nature, and can be easily confused with the Tasmanian Thornbill or Tasmanian Scrubwren.

Description

Up to 120mm long, the Scrubtit has a light cream coloured throat, breast and belly and a brown head, and a brown eye with  a black centre and white eye ring which assists in distinguishing the species.

Habitat

The Scrubtit occurs within the dense undergrowth in rainforest and wet eucalypt forest, particularly dense gullies.

Diet

The Scrubtit forages individually, in pairs or in small family groups near the ground, taking insects and other invertebrates among bark, litter and foliage. The species will associate with mixed-species feeding flocks.

Breeding

It breeds from September to December, laying 3 white lightly spotted eggs in a woven, domed nest with a side entrance, usually placed 1-3 metres above the ground.

Distribution Map courtesy Natural Values Atlas, data from theLIST
© 2010 State of Tasmania

Call

The species is often silent but the call is a quiet, double chirp or warble.

Distribution

This uncommon bird is found in suitable habitat throughout Tasmania, except Flinders Island.