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08/08/2018

The Parks and Wildlife Service has completed the construction of a new picnic shelter at Penny's Lagoon within the Lavinia State Reserve on King Island.
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31/07/2018

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Summary of Draft Tasman National Park and Reserves Fire Management Plan 2006

The full version of the Summary of Draft Tasman National Park and Reserves Fire Management Plan 2006 can be downloaded as a PDF File (2000 Kb).

Constituent maps are available as separate PDFs:

  • Map 1 - Tenure (1300 Kb) 
  • Map 2 - Vegetation (2270 Kb) 
  • Map 3 - Fire history (1660 Kb) 
  • Map 4 - Natural & cultural assets (1730 Kb) 
  • Map 5 - Exclusion zones –earthmoving equipment & fire (1610 Kb) 
  • Map 6 - Fire management zones (1610 Kb) 
  • Map 7 - Fire breaks – Eaglehawk Neck area (391 Kb) 
  • Map 8.1 - Planned burning units – Walters Opening (876 Kb) 
  • Map 8.2 - Planned burning units – Eaglehawk Neck area (398 Kb) 
  • Map 8.3 - Planned burning units – Tasman Arch area (355 Kb) 
  • Map 8.4 - Planned burning units – Fortecue Bay to Cape Pillar (895 Kb) 
  • Map 8.5 - Planned burning units – White Beach to Tunnel Bay (919 Kb)

Summary

This fire management plan covers Tasman National Park and adjacent reserves in the vicinity of Eaglehawk Neck (Eaglehawk Neck Historic Site & Pirates Bay State Reserve).

The primary objective of fire management within Reserves is to reduce the risk of fire to life and property and maintain the natural diversity of species and communities through applying appropriate fire frequencies (Tasmanian Reserves Management Code of Practice 2003).

The objective of this fire management plan is to prescribe works and actions which will reduce the threat of bushfire to people, neighbouring property and natural assets. This is given a high priority in the Tasman National Park & Reserves Management Plan (2001). This plan also supersedes the Tasman Arch State Reserve & Eaglehawk Neck Historic Site Fire Management Plan 1997.

Natural and cultural information relevant to fire management planning of the area is provided and should be read in conjunction with the Tasman National Park and Reserves Management Plan 2001. This information includes descriptions of the physical environment, cultural history, recreational use, vegetation, fauna and weather. Assets which are at risk from bushfire are identified, including neighbouring property and natural assets.

Fire management zones have been identified to ensure appropriate management actions are implemented in the National Park. The fire management zones form the basis for the recommended works and actions.

Works and actions have been recommended to improve visitor safety and maintain vegetation types, these include the maintenance of fire trails and fire breaks, implementing 11 fuel reduction burns and 10 ecological burns (about 1200ha in total), the construction of water holes and monitoring of the impact of fire on vegetation and threatened species.

The recommendations are not a panacea but are considered appropriate for managing the risks associated with fire and other National Park, Historic Site and State Reserve management objectives.