Our Latest News

Fly Neighbourly Advice for the Tasman National Park

24/08/2019

Public comment is invited on the draft Tasman National Park Fly Neighbourly Advice. The draft Fly Neighbourly Advice has been prepared by the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service in response to increasing air traffic over the Tasman National Park.More

Hybrid diesel-electric shuttle buses at Cradle Mountain - a first for National p

19/08/2019

When you next visit Cradle Mountain you will be able to step aboard one of the new hybrid, diesel-electric, shuttle buses on your trip to Dove Lake. These new buses will reduce emissions and deliver a quieter, all mobility friendly, visitor experience.More

AFAC Independent Operational Review of the 2018-19 bushfires

08/08/2019

Following the 2018-19 bushfires the Tasmanian Government commissioned an independent report by the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Council to review the overall response and identify areas where more can be done to improve the State's response andMore

Crab-Eater Seal

The crab-eater seal breeds on the Antarctic pack ice; however, there have been over 20 reports of this species on the Australian mainland.

There have been three records of crab-eater seals in Tasmania. The first was in 1945 when a carcass was found at Ralph's Bay. In 1996 a dead crab-eater was also found in North West Bay (south of Hobart). In October 1999 a live crab-eater was found at Primrose Sands. This is the first reported live sighting of this species in Tasmania.

Contrary to their name, the crab-eater seal does not eat crabs but feeds almost exclusively on krill – small shrimp like crustaceans. They sieve krill from the water with the cusps of their teeth . Crab-eater seals have been found to dive as deep as 300m.