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Fly Neighbourly Advice for the Tasman National Park

24/08/2019

Public comment is invited on the draft Tasman National Park Fly Neighbourly Advice. The draft Fly Neighbourly Advice has been prepared by the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service in response to increasing air traffic over the Tasman National Park.More

Hybrid diesel-electric shuttle buses at Cradle Mountain - a first for National p

19/08/2019

When you next visit Cradle Mountain you will be able to step aboard one of the new hybrid, diesel-electric, shuttle buses on your trip to Dove Lake. These new buses will reduce emissions and deliver a quieter, all mobility friendly, visitor experience.More

AFAC Independent Operational Review of the 2018-19 bushfires

08/08/2019

Following the 2018-19 bushfires the Tasmanian Government commissioned an independent report by the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Council to review the overall response and identify areas where more can be done to improve the State's response andMore

Southern Brown Bandicoot, Isoodon obesulus

The southern brown bandicoot is easily distinguished from the eastern barred bandicoot as its fur is a relatively uniform, grizled, dark brown and rather coarse to touch. Its muzzle, ears and hindfeet are shorter than those of the eastern barred bandicoot, and its tail is dark brown in colour.

Breeding and habitat

Breeding occurs from winter through to the end of summer. Gestation, as in the barred bandicoot is a mere 12 days. Litter size, as in the barred bandicoot, is 1-4, with old females usually producing the larger litters. Three or litters may be reared each year. Longevity is no more than three years.

The species is widespread but prefers areas with low ground cover.Such habitat is often maintained through regular burning. During the day it rests on the ground in a nest of grasses and leaf litter.

Behaviour

The species is nocturnal and solitary. The diet consists of insects and their larvae, underground fungi, worms, lizards and berries. When foraging, it digs characeristic conical holes with its well-clawed front feet.

The brown bandicoot is relatively common in suitable habitat and its status appears to be secure. It is wholly protected.