Our Latest News

Fly Neighbourly Advice for the Tasman National Park

24/08/2019

Public comment is invited on the draft Tasman National Park Fly Neighbourly Advice. The draft Fly Neighbourly Advice has been prepared by the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service in response to increasing air traffic over the Tasman National Park.More

Hybrid diesel-electric shuttle buses at Cradle Mountain - a first for National p

19/08/2019

When you next visit Cradle Mountain you will be able to step aboard one of the new hybrid, diesel-electric, shuttle buses on your trip to Dove Lake. These new buses will reduce emissions and deliver a quieter, all mobility friendly, visitor experience.More

AFAC Independent Operational Review of the 2018-19 bushfires

08/08/2019

Following the 2018-19 bushfires the Tasmanian Government commissioned an independent report by the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Council to review the overall response and identify areas where more can be done to improve the State's response andMore

White-footed Dunnart, Sminthopsis leucopus

Perhaps the least well-known of the Tasmanian marsupials is the tiny white-footed dunnart. This small (20-30 grams) carnivorous marsupial is one of a dozen or so described species of dunnart occuring in Australia.

Confined to Tasmania and the extreme south east coast of mainland Australia, the white-footed dunnart is found in a variety of habitats, ranging from rainforest, open forest and dry coastal heath. It also occurs on Flinders Island.

It is nocturnal and feeds on invertebrates, lizards. During daylight hours, the animal rests in tree hollows, rotting logs, wood piles and other such sites. Individuals are often only noticed after hollowed trees have been cut down - revealing the importance of hollow trees for this and numerous other species.

Birth occurs in spring. Up to eight young are born (there are eight teats).

The white-footed dunnart is presumed to be secure, largely on the basis of the wide variety of habitats in which it is able to occur. However, insufficient information is available to form an accurate assessment of its conservation status.