Our Latest News

Fly Neighbourly Advice for the Tasman National Park

24/08/2019

Public comment is invited on the draft Tasman National Park Fly Neighbourly Advice. The draft Fly Neighbourly Advice has been prepared by the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service in response to increasing air traffic over the Tasman National Park.More

Hybrid diesel-electric shuttle buses at Cradle Mountain - a first for National p

19/08/2019

When you next visit Cradle Mountain you will be able to step aboard one of the new hybrid, diesel-electric, shuttle buses on your trip to Dove Lake. These new buses will reduce emissions and deliver a quieter, all mobility friendly, visitor experience.More

AFAC Independent Operational Review of the 2018-19 bushfires

08/08/2019

Following the 2018-19 bushfires the Tasmanian Government commissioned an independent report by the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Council to review the overall response and identify areas where more can be done to improve the State's response andMore

Southern Bottlenose Whale

Drawing by Graham Sanders
Southern Bottlenose Whales reach 7.8m in the female and weigh about 4 tons. Like other beaked whales they have a robust body shape, short flippers, a large bulbous shaped forehead, a pair of throat grooves and a short dolphin-like beak. Mature males have a squarer forehead and a single pair of teeth at the jaw tip. They are chocolate brown to yellow in colour with lighter flanks and belly. The dorsal fin is sickle-shaped and set well back. They have been sighted in Antarctic waters and off Southern Africa in small social groups of three to ten individuals but sightings are rare. Their blow is similar to that of a Sperm Whale.

General Information

Southern Bottlenose Whales occur throughout the southern hemisphere and are related to the Northern Bottlenose Whale. They are a deep water species living off the continental shelf. They reach maturity at about 11 years of age and 6m in length and may live for 50 years. Calves are usually born in spring or summer every few years but little is known about their biology. They mostly feed on squid and other cephlapods and use their massive melon forehead to produce high energy sounds to stun their prey. They lack functional teeth.

Stranding Information

Most of the stranding records of Southern Bottlenose Whales occur in New Zealand but at least 14 have been recorded from Australian states with most from South Australia and three records of single animals from Tasmania, the first being a skull collected from Ocean Beach.