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Fly Neighbourly Advice for the Tasman National Park

24/08/2019

Public comment is invited on the draft Tasman National Park Fly Neighbourly Advice. The draft Fly Neighbourly Advice has been prepared by the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service in response to increasing air traffic over the Tasman National Park.More

Hybrid diesel-electric shuttle buses at Cradle Mountain - a first for National p

19/08/2019

When you next visit Cradle Mountain you will be able to step aboard one of the new hybrid, diesel-electric, shuttle buses on your trip to Dove Lake. These new buses will reduce emissions and deliver a quieter, all mobility friendly, visitor experience.More

AFAC Independent Operational Review of the 2018-19 bushfires

08/08/2019

Following the 2018-19 bushfires the Tasmanian Government commissioned an independent report by the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Council to review the overall response and identify areas where more can be done to improve the State's response andMore

Short-finned Pilot Whale

Drawing by Graham Sanders
Like the Long-finned Pilot Whale, the Short-finned Pilot Whale has an exaggerated, bulbous melon (head) and indistinct beak, with a broad wide dorsal fin and slender sickle-shaped flippers. They have a wider skull than the Long-finned Pilot Whale and less vivid colouration ventrally (pale anchor between flippers) but the grey patch behind the dorsal fin is often quite large and obvious. Their flippers are only about 20% of their body length compared to up to 30% in the Long-finned Pilot Whale. They reach maturity at about 5m and 1.5-2 tonnes at around 17 years of age and can live over 60 years. They form very close bonds with pods ranging from 10-30 individuals up to several hundred. They often swim with Bottle-nosed Dolphins with the adult pilot males and dolphins remaining on the perimeter to protect juveniles. They tend to occur in tropical waters.

General Information

There are two forms of the Short-finned Pilot Whale occuring off Japan: the southern and northern forms both of which are still subject to small scale whaling. They are a deep water species feeding on squid and fish and reach depths of around 800m. They tend to move closer inshore when following spawning squid. Weighing 55kg at birth and measuring 1.4m they are generally weaned at around 2 years but can suckle until 15 years of age. Males migrate to new pods which are based on groups of related females after weaning.

Stranding Information

There have only been a few Short-finned Pilot Whale stranding events in Australia. Tasmania has only had a couple of stranding events, including one mass stranding event of 60 animals in 1990 at Blackmans Bay. Most strandings occur in the mainland states, particularly in South Australia, New South Wales and Queensland. Most mass strandings have occurred off Hawaii, USA, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.