Our Latest News

Fly Neighbourly Advice for the Tasman National Park

24/08/2019

Public comment is invited on the draft Tasman National Park Fly Neighbourly Advice. The draft Fly Neighbourly Advice has been prepared by the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service in response to increasing air traffic over the Tasman National Park.More

Hybrid diesel-electric shuttle buses at Cradle Mountain - a first for National p

19/08/2019

When you next visit Cradle Mountain you will be able to step aboard one of the new hybrid, diesel-electric, shuttle buses on your trip to Dove Lake. These new buses will reduce emissions and deliver a quieter, all mobility friendly, visitor experience.More

AFAC Independent Operational Review of the 2018-19 bushfires

08/08/2019

Following the 2018-19 bushfires the Tasmanian Government commissioned an independent report by the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Council to review the overall response and identify areas where more can be done to improve the State's response andMore

Dwarf Sperm Whale

Drawing by Graham Sanders
The snout of the Dwarf Sperm Whale is more pointed than that of the Pygmy Sperm Whale and its dorsal fin is larger and set nearer to the middle of the back. It is the smallest whale, reaching less than 3m and about 300kg making it similar in size or smaller than a dolphin. They can occur in groups of up to ten

General Information

Dwarf Sperm Whales are an oceanic species which occur worldwide. They prefer warmer waters than the Pygmy Sperm Whale. They reach sexual maturity when around 2m in length and can live up to 22 years. Calves may be born yearly and are weaned at about 1.3m in length.

Stranding Information

They are occasionally found stranded in Tasmania as well as South Australia, New South Wales, Western Australia and the Northern Territory. Although considered an oceanic species it approaches the coast more often than the Pygmy Sperm Whale. In Australian waters sightings are rare and they are less likely to strand than the Pygmy Sperm Whale.