Our Latest News

Fly Neighbourly Advice for the Tasman National Park

24/08/2019

Public comment is invited on the draft Tasman National Park Fly Neighbourly Advice. The draft Fly Neighbourly Advice has been prepared by the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service in response to increasing air traffic over the Tasman National Park.More

Hybrid diesel-electric shuttle buses at Cradle Mountain - a first for National p

19/08/2019

When you next visit Cradle Mountain you will be able to step aboard one of the new hybrid, diesel-electric, shuttle buses on your trip to Dove Lake. These new buses will reduce emissions and deliver a quieter, all mobility friendly, visitor experience.More

AFAC Independent Operational Review of the 2018-19 bushfires

08/08/2019

Following the 2018-19 bushfires the Tasmanian Government commissioned an independent report by the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Council to review the overall response and identify areas where more can be done to improve the State's response andMore

Strap-toothed Beaked Whale

Strap-toothed Beaked Whale(Drawing by Graham Sanders) 
The Strap-toothed Beaked Whale is rarely seen, as this is an open-ocean species. It can be identified by its small melon shaped head which has a grey band behind and joins with a light grey band on the dorsal surface. Smaller than Cuviers Beaked Whales, Strap-toothed Beaked Whales reach about 6 m in length and weigh up to 2 ton. Males have a pair of long, strap-shaped teeth (tusks) in the lower jaw that prevent them fully opening their mouths as they curl backward and inward. They are known to bask on calm, sunny days and sink slowly below the surface. They do not generally show their flukes on diving, which lasts at least 10 minutes. They are generally black/grey in colour, some with a brownish tinge and white underside. They have a white throat-patch which extends behind the eye and blends with a lighter grey on the dorsal surface. In other characteristics they are similar to other beaked whales with a slender body and long dolphin-like beak, triangular tail fluke and small sickle-shaped dorsal fin.

General Information

Distribution map of sightings and strandings (click to enlarge)
They are generally solitary but can be found in groups of up to three. They reach sexually maturity at around 5 years and can live up to 40 years. They are an open-ocean species that hunt mainly squid.

Stranding Information

The Strap-toothed Beaked Whale is Australia’s most common beaked whale to strand with over 70 recorded events. In most cases they are found singly stranded and dead but in a few cases there have been more than one animal involved. South Australia and Tasmania have the most incidents with around 30 standing events each.