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Bruny Island Neck reopen following major redevelopment

12/12/2018

Bruny Island tourism icon, The Neck, has reopened following a major redevelopment and improvement to the visitor facilities at the popular site.
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Fairbrother wins contract for Cradle Mountain Gateway Precinct

12/12/2018

A key milestone in the implementation of the Cradle Mountain Master Plan project has been reached with Tasmanian construction company Fairbrother awarded a $12 million contract for work on the Cradle Mountain Visitor Gateway Precinct.More

Milkshakes Hill Regional Reserve reopened

26/11/2018

The Tarkine Drive visitor experience has been further enhanced with the reopening of the Milkshake Hills Regional Reserve.
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Silvereye, Zosterops lateralis

SilvereyePhoto by Peter Grant

Description

The Silvereye is a small (to 125mm) bird with a conspicuous white eye-ring. Tasmanian birds have olive-green upperparts and a grey back, throat and breast. The flanks are chestnut and the undertail coverts are off-white.

Habitat

Silvereyes occur in a wide range of habitats, from forest and scrub to orchards and gardens.

Diet

Silvereyes feed on insects, fruit and nectar. They can cause damage to commercial and domestic orchards.

Breeding

During the breeding season (August to February) males and females establish small territories which they actively defend. The nest is constructed by both sexes and comprises a small, neatly woven cup of grasses, moss, hair, and other fine vegetation, bound with cobwebs. It is placed between branches in the outer foliage of shrubs or small trees. Two to four bluish-green eggs are laid. Both sexes share the ten-day incubation and the feeding of young. If conditions are suitable two to three clutches will be raised in a season.

Call

High, sharp ‘tseep’ as a contact call and "we-wee-ee-ee-ee" in alarm. (Audio recordings courtesy of David Stewart/Nature Sound)

Distribution Map courtesy Natural Values Atlas, data from theLIST
© 2011 State of Tasmania

Distribution

Silvereyes occur from Cape York Peninsula, Queensland, through the southeast, south and south-west to  Shark Bay, Western Australia. They are most common in the southeast.

In Tasmania, the species is widespread and occurs on Flinders and King islands. Most birds move north each autumn, and move back south in late winter to breed. Migrating birds can travel as far as south Queensland.