Our Latest News

Fly Neighbourly Advice for the Tasman National Park

24/08/2019

Public comment is invited on the draft Tasman National Park Fly Neighbourly Advice. The draft Fly Neighbourly Advice has been prepared by the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service in response to increasing air traffic over the Tasman National Park.More

Hybrid diesel-electric shuttle buses at Cradle Mountain - a first for National p

19/08/2019

When you next visit Cradle Mountain you will be able to step aboard one of the new hybrid, diesel-electric, shuttle buses on your trip to Dove Lake. These new buses will reduce emissions and deliver a quieter, all mobility friendly, visitor experience.More

AFAC Independent Operational Review of the 2018-19 bushfires

08/08/2019

Following the 2018-19 bushfires the Tasmanian Government commissioned an independent report by the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Council to review the overall response and identify areas where more can be done to improve the State's response andMore

Enchanted Walk

30. Enchanted Walk

time 20 minute circuit (1.1km circuit)
access Road C132. 1 hour from Sheffield; 1.25 hours from Devonport. See map
fees Park entry fees apply.
facilities Picnic and toilet facilities nearby
grade Level 2.
what to take Group A items are required
cautions Supervise children, flowing water, severe weather conditions all year round, weather may change quickly, tracks are difficult to navigate when covered in snow
prohibited No pets, firearms or bicycles

A walk to suit all age groups. For company there’s a cascading river, wombat burrows and magical old-growth rainforest. The walk is located in Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair National Park

Highlights

The walk will take you through buttongrass moorland before entering cool temperate rainforest along the edges of Pencil Pine Creek. Along the track are three interpretive tunnels that kids and kids at heart will find fun to crawl through!

Wombat Burrows  (41º 35' 45" S   145º 55' 34" E)
Along the western bank of the Pencil Pine Creek you will come across several wombat burrows just on the edge of the track. Wombats do occur in the area, although you are more likely to see them around dusk and dawn. The species occurring in Tasmania, the common wombat, is one of three species found in Australia.

The wombat is the largest burrowing mammal. Wombats often dig their burrows in the areas above creeks and gullies. Burrows can be up to 20 m long and more than 2 m below the ground.

The wombats powerful legs and long, strong claws are used in the excavation of burrows. Wombats are unique among marsupials in having constantly growing upper and lower incisors (front teeth), like a beaver. This allows the wombat to cut through obstructions while burrowing. Being marsupials, female wombats have a pouch that in their case opens backward to prevent dirt and debris entering while burrowing!