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Encounter Maria Island

20/10/2017

Encounter Maria Island's new ferry Osprey V, that will allow even more visitors to enjoy one of the State's best tourism attractions, was launched today.More

Progress on Cradle Mountain Master Plan

19/10/2017

An important milestone in the Cradle Mountain Master Plan project has been reached following a competitive tender process, with Cumulus Studio chosen to design the Cradle Mountain gateway precinct and the Dove Lake viewing shelter.More

Exciting new proposal for Tasmania's South East Cape

16/10/2017

Award-winning local tourism operator Ian Johnstone can now progress a new project to lease and licence negotiations under the Tourism Opportunities in Tasmania's National Parks, Reserves and Crown Land process.More

Summary of Peter Murrell State Reserve and Conservation Area Fire Management Plan 2006

The full version of the Peter Murrell State Reserve and Conservation Area Fire Management Plan 2006 can be downloaded as a PDF File (503 Kb).

Constituent maps are available as separate PDFs:

  • Map 1 - Location (PDF 1 050Kb)
  • Map 2 - Vegetation and Species with Conservation Status (619 Kb) 
  • Map 3 - Indicative Prescribed Burn Blocks (585 Kb)

Summary

The Peter Murrell Reserves are adjoined Reserves located between the suburbs of Kingston, Howden and Blackmans Bay. The Reserves represent an important area in terms of natural and cultural heritage, recreational activities and educational values.

The fire history of the Reserves is largely unknown, however a major fire in 1988 burnt part of the Tinderbox peninsula, including the now Peter Murrell Reserves. The major concern from a fire management perspective is the adjoining residential properties on the eastern and southern boundaries that back on to the Reserves, the loss of species and increased weed management issues due to inappropriate fire regimes and management.

A bushfire on days of high or above Fire Danger would be considered a major threat to the Reserve values, surrounding assets and community. The region is likely to experience about 20 days a year that reach a Fire Danger Index of high or above. The overarching purpose of this plan is to recommend actions and works that mitigate the risk of bushfire to life, property and the environment. The vegetation types in the Reserves are adapted to fire and implementing an appropriate fire regime is critical to maintaining species diversity, fuel loads and managing weed problems.

A number of recommendations are made to address the risks involved with prevention and suppression of fire. Recommendations focus around maintaining the annual fire break and fire trail slashing program and maintaining a mosaic of vegetation ages by implementing a prescribed burning program. The actions and works recommended are not a panacea, but are considered appropriate for managing the risks associated with fire and other Reserve management objectives. An integral part of the fire management plan is the ongoing management of weed infestations in the Reserves.

The plan is intended to be current until 2016, any new natural or cultural heritage information that comes to light should be considered in the implementation of the management actions.