Our Latest News

A fantastic summer opportunity at Freycinet

12/09/2014

The Parks and Wildlife Service and Wildcare Friends of Freycinet are keen to hear from people that love the outdoors, enjoy meeting with fellow campers and are independent workers, for summer programs in Freycinet National Park.More

Copper Cove boardwalk ready for summer walkers

08/09/2014

A boardwalk along the scenic Coastal Track from Bakers Beach to Badger Beach at Narawntapu National Park has been completed just in time to welcome the influx of walkers visiting in spring and summer.More

Funding for walking tracks

22/08/2014

The Tasmanian Government has committed funding totalling $6 million for the South Coast Track and the final stage of the Three Capes Track.More

Summary of Logan Lagoon Conservation Area Draft Management Plan 2000

The full version of the Logan Lagoon Conservation Area Draft Management Plan can be downloaded as a PDF File (667 Kb)

Summary

Logan Lagoon Conservation Area on the south-east corner of Flinders Island in Bass Strait, is internationally recognised as a significant wetland, by its listing under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (the Ramsar Convention). The lagoon contains a particularly good example of a near natural wetland and provides feeding and resting habitat for a number of migratory waders including the red-necked stint, common greenshank, eastern curlew, bar-tailed godwit and double-banded plover, and is one of the major summer feeding grounds in Tasmania for these species. Twenty of these bird species are listed in international agreements between Australia and China and Japan, under which Australia has obligations to ensure the protection of listed migratory bird species and their habitats. The importance of Logan Lagoon as a wader feeding and resting site is also recognised with the lagoon being listed on the East Asian - Australasian Shorebird Site Network. The network links wetlands that are internationally important for shorebirds (waders) and occur within the East Asian - Australian Flyway. Logan Lagoon is one of only two Tasmanian sites out of the nine Australian sites on the network.

Little terns, listed as endangered under Tasmanian and Commonwealth threatened species legislation have been recorded breeding in the area.

Logan Lagoon’s flora communities contain good examples of native coastal vegetation with remnant patches of pre-European vegetation types. The Holocene shorelines that incorporate the lagoon are representative and outstanding geomorphological examples for the local region.

The reserve is close to the township of Lady Barron, and is a popular location for the community and visitors. Recreational uses include walking, sightseeing, bird watching, off-road vehicle driving and beach fishing.

Logan Lagoon Conservation Area will be managed to protect its outstanding natural and cultural values, and provide for an appropriate range of recreational opportunities.

To these ends, the management plan proposes:

  • greater involvement of the community, land owners and other stakeholders in management of the conservation area;
  • liaising with neighbouring land managers to achieve co-operative and complementary management of adjoining areas, to protect the values of the conservation area;
  • providing continued access for off-road vehicle users to the southern beach for fishing, whilst managing summer use of Planter Beach, to avoid disturbance of vulnerable shorebirds and damage to dunes and vegetation;
  • improved interpretation of the Ramsar site, and investigating the potential for a bird hide and short interpreted walk; and
  • guidelines for artificial breaching of the lagoon mouth under conditions of high water.