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Overland Track re-opens for walkers

02/02/2016

The Parks and Wildlife Service has advised that the Overland Track will re-open to bushwalkers as of Wednesday morning, 3 February 2016.More

Join in World Wetlands Day celebrations

28/01/2016

The Tamar Island Wetlands Centre will host a range of free activities on Tuesday 2 February 2016 to celebrate World Wetlands Day.More

Major fire fighting effort protecting public and state's important values

27/01/2016

The Parks and Wildlife Service General Manager Peter Mooney has acknowledged the efforts of Department staff, Tasmania Fire Service, volunteers and interstate firefighters who are continuing to undertake a major effort to protect values and infrastructureMore

Tinderbox Marine Reserve

Introduction

seadragon

Seadragon amongst sea lettuce by Heidi Dungey

 

Tinderbox Marine Nature Reserve was declared to provide a safe, sheltered marine study area for education, research and recreation. A beach and the foreshore are included within the reserve.

 

Tinderbox reserve is a great place to go for a snorkel or scuba dive. To the south, the rock platform drops 2 or 3 metres to sand. It is an ideal place for snorkellers to explore the ledges and crevices in the reef. To the north, the reef is wider and extends into deeper water. Progressing towards the Derwent Estuary, the reef becomes increasingly exposed to weather and the reef structure becomes more complex and drops more quickly into deeper water. Leatherjackets and wrasse are common on the reef, and if you look amongst the kelp you may be lucky enough to see a big-bellied seahorse or an octopus.

View of Tinderbox Marine Reserve

View of Tinderbox Marine Reserve

Another place to dive is to head directly out from the beach. The bottom drops gradually to 12 metres, then more quickly to well over 25 metres. A dive here on the open soft bottom in greenish water is an unusual experience for many, and provides an opportunity to see spiny pipehorses or Tasmanian numbfish. Look out for feeding tentacles of numerous Holothurians (sea cucumbers) that live buried in the sediment. A night dive along the edge of the reef is a good place to see volutes and gurnards.

The reserve is jointly managed by the Parks and Wildlife Service (03 6121 7026) and Marine Resources.