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Tasmanian fuel reduction program an Australian first

23/03/2015

Tasmanian communities will be safer from the threat of bushfires, with a ground-breaking new $28.5 million program of fuel reduction burns announced today.More

Three Capes Track hut contracts awarded

19/03/2015

Two Tasmanian companies have been awarded contracts worth a total of $6.5 million to construct the huts on the Three Capes Track.More

Temporary access changes for The Nut

18/03/2015

Access to the tracks at the summit of The Nut State Reserve at Stanley will be by the chairlift only, from Monday 23 March to Friday 27 March, 2015, due to safety works being undertaken on the Zig Zag track.

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Tinderbox Marine Reserve

Introduction

seadragon

Seadragon amongst sea lettuce by Heidi Dungey

Tinderbox Marine Nature Reserve was declared to provide a safe, sheltered marine study area for education, research and recreation. A beach and the foreshore are included within the reserve.

Tinderbox reserve is a great place to go for a snorkel or scuba dive. To the south, the rock platform drops 2 or 3 metres to sand. It is an ideal place for snorkellers to explore the ledges and crevices in the reef. To the north, the reef is wider and extends into deeper water. Progressing towards the Derwent Estuary, the reef becomes increasingly exposed to weather and the reef structure becomes more complex and drops more quickly into deeper water. Leatherjackets and wrasse are common on the reef, and if you look amongst the kelp you may be lucky enough to see a big-bellied seahorse or an octopus.

View of Tinderbox Marine Reserve

View of Tinderbox Marine Reserve

Another place to dive is to head directly out from the beach. The bottom drops gradually to 12 metres, then more quickly to well over 25 metres. A dive here on the open soft bottom in greenish water is an unusual experience for many, and provides an opportunity to see spiny pipehorses or Tasmanian numbfish. Look out for feeding tentacles of numerous Holothurians (sea cucumbers) that live buried in the sediment. A night dive along the edge of the reef is a good place to see volutes and gurnards.

The reserve is jointly managed by the Parks and Wildlife Service (03 6233 6560) and Marine Resources (03 6233 2044).