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Replacement of Cockle Creek bridge

09/07/2014

Visitors to Cockle Creek in Tasmania's Far South are advised that the Cockle Creek bridge will be closed from approximately 14 July to the end of August 2014, while the old bridge is removed and a replacement bridge is constructed.More

Firewood theft can be costly

08/07/2014

The Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) is warning that unlawfully cutting trees for firewood on reserved land can be a costly exercise and that remote cameras are being used to catch offenders.More

Caretakers wanted for island's historic site

08/07/2014

Fancy spending a few weeks at the fascinating Quarantine Station on Bruny Island? The Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) and Wildcare Inc Friends of Bruny Island Quarantine Station are seeking volunteer caretakers for the station for the 2014/15 summer.More

Bougainville's skink, Lerista bougainvillii

Bougainville's skink

The Bougainville's skink is rarely seen as it spends most of its life under the cover of leaf-litter, loose sand or thin slabs of stone. The limbs of this species are relatively small and this small skink moves in a sinuous, snake-like manner.

Description

This distinctive species is well adapted to a life spent under the surface, with a long, slender body, a narrow, flattened head and short legs. Bougainville's skinks are pale silvery grey to brown above, with a reddish tail and a sharp edged black stripe along body sides. There is never any trace of a vertebral stripe. The lower lips are barred with black and the frontoparietal shields are paired in this species. The head and body length is up to 70 mm. The bougainville's skink is so distinctive in body shape that it is unlikely to be confused with any other species of Tasmanian skink.

Ecology

Bougainville's skinks forage beneath leaf litter on sandy soil for small invertebrates, swimming through the broken-down leaf litter and sand through sinuous undulations of their elongated bodies. In such an environment, legs tend to get in the way, and the limbs of Bougainville's skinks are very much reduced. These small skinks do not bask on the surface like most Tasmanian reptiles, raising their body temperature instead by moving into leaf litter or sand that has been warmed by the sun. Consequently they live in areas where the canopy is open and the ground is warmed enough for them to become active. This species is unlikely to be encountered, but may be found while raking leaf litter or digging in loose soil.

Breeding

This unusual species shows geographic variation in reproduction, being egg laying on the Australian mainland. In Tasmanian specimens the 2 or 3 young are deposited in only partially calcified eggs which hatch within a few days.

Distribution

Although fairly widespread in southeastern mainland Australia, this species is known from few locations in Tasmania, having been found only at Cape Portland and Waterhouse Point on the Tasmanian mainland. Bougainville's skinks have also been recorded from the following Tasmanian Islands: Babel Is., Big Green Is., Curtis Is., Deal Is., East Hogan Is., East Moncouer Is., Hogan Is., Little Anderson Is., Mount Chappell Is., North East Is., South West Is., Swan Is., Vansittart Is. and Waterhouse Is.. The species was originally described from Kangaroo Island, S.A.

Status

The status of this small skink is presently under review. On mainland Tasmania this species appears to be declining, as a recent search failed to locate a single specimen in the Waterhouse Point area. No mainland Tasmanian populations are known to occur in National Parks.

Threats

Changes in fire ecology may alter the ground cover and thus temperature gradients available to this species.