Our Latest News

Fuel reduction burn at Wineglass Bay Lookout Track on 25-26 May 2015

21/05/2015

Weather permitting, the Parks and Wildlife Service will undertake a fuel reduction burn at the Wineglass Bay Lookout Track, within Freycinet National Park, on Monday 25 May and Tuesday 26 May. The burn is part of the statewide Fuel Reduction Program.More

Lease agreement for Entally Historic Site

04/05/2015

Tasmania's historic heritage is one of our greatest assets and the Tasmanian Government is pleased to announce a lease agreement with Entally Lodge Pty Ltd to ensure a bright future for the Entally Historic Site at Hadspen.More

Major fuel reduction burn to protect North-East towns

28/04/2015

A large strategic fuel reduction burn today across public land, Forestry land and private property will reduce bushfire risk to Gladstone, Eddystone Point and Ansons Bay in Tasmania's North East.More

Yellow-throated Honeyeater, Lichenostomus flavicollis

Yellow-throated honeyeaterYellow-throated Honeyeater
(Photography by Dave Watts)

Description

The endemic Yellow-throated Honeyeater is a common resident throughout Tasmania. It is a medium sized bird, up to 210mm, with  olive-green colouring on the wings and back and speckled yellow-grey underparts. The dark grey crown and face contrasts with a rich yellow chin and throat.

Females are smaller than males. Young birds are very similar to adults, but duller overall.

Habitat

Usually seen singly or in pairs, often foraging on the trunks or foliage of large trees. Its preferred habitat is wet and dry eucalypt forest, alpine woodland and coastal heath. It is also commonly seen in gardens and parks.

Diet

The Yellow-throated Honeyeater feeds mainly on seasonally available insects and nectar, and occasionally on fruit and seeds. It feeds at all levels of the canopy, foraging on foliage, bark and flowers for insects and nectar.

Breeding

Males hold territories year-round,  defending them against others of their own species as well as other birds – particularly other honeyeaters. The species breeds from August to December, and lays two to three spotted pinkish eggs in a cup-shaped nest made from closely woven grass, bark and spider-web, and is lined with fur or hair collected from live animals - including humans! The nest, which is built by the female, is usually within a metre of the ground amongst dense shrubs. The male will feed nestlings if the female starts a second brood.

Call

Its call is a loud, metallic "tonk tonk tonk".

Distribution Map courtesy Natural Values Atlas, data from theLIST
© 2010 State of Tasmania

Distribution

Found in suitable habitat throughout Tasmania.