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Funding for walking tracks

22/08/2014

The Tasmanian Government has committed funding totalling $6 million for the South Coast Track and the final stage of the Three Capes Track.More

Cockle Creek bridge update

12/08/2014

Work is progressing on construction of a new bridge at Cockle Creek. The photo shows the strengthening works completed on the existing bridge, new piles and head stock for the replacement bridge, and the excavator preparing for new piles to be driven.More

Replacement of Cockle Creek bridge

09/07/2014

Visitors to Cockle Creek in Tasmania's Far South are advised that the Cockle Creek bridge will be closed from approximately 14 July to the end of August 2014, while the old bridge is removed and a replacement bridge is constructed.More

Common Ringtail Possum, Pseudocheirus peregrinus

Ring tail possum Common ringtail possum
(Photograph by Steve Johnson)

Like all ringtail possums, the common ringtail possum has a strongly prehensile tail which acts as a fifth limb, and which is carried tightly coiled when not being used. It can be distinguished from the brushtail by the light covering of fur on its tail, as well as the white tail tip.

Distribution and habitat

The common ringtail occurs along the entire length of the eastern seaboard of mainland Australia and in the south west corner of western Australia. It is widespread throughout Tasmania, where it occurs in a variety of vegetation types, especially eucalypt forests and areas of tall, dense tea-tree.

Diet

Ringtail possum footprint

The ringtail feeds on leaves, as well as flowers. The ringtail is well adapted to a diet of eucalypt leaves, apparently being capable of detoxifying the tannins and phenols in the animal's caecum (a part of the gut). The low metabolic rate of the species is believed to compensate for the relatively low energy yield of its diet.

It is strictly nocturnal and, unlike the brushtail possum, is strongly aboreal, spending little time on the ground. Spherical nests about the size of a football, called dreys, are constructed from bark and grass among the dense canopy of the understorey. The ringtail is unusual among possums in being an active nest builder.

Breeding

Females give birth between April and November, usually to two young which remain in the pouch for about four months. After this time the young often ride on the mothers back.

ringtail possum1ringtail possum2

Two colour phases of the common ringtail

(Photographs by Peter Tonelli)