Our Latest News

Tenders called for Mt Mawson shelter

27/03/2017

Tenders have been called for the construction of a new public shelter at Mt Mawson within Mount Field National Park.More

Local company awarded contract to replace Lake Tahune Hut and facilities

22/03/2017

Westbury company Valley Workshop has been awarded the contract to demolish and replace the hut and toilet facilities at Lake Tahune on the Frenchmans Cap walking track, a project worth $450,000.More

Upgrading the Dip Falls viewing experience

14/03/2017

The visitor experience at Dip Falls in the State's North-West will soon be enhanced thanks to the construction of new stairs, allowing visitors to admire the spectacular view and natural wonder of the falls.More

Southern Brown Bandicoot, Isoodon obesulus

The southern brown bandicoot is easily distinguished from the eastern barred bandicoot as its fur is a relatively uniform, grizled, dark brown and rather coarse to touch. Its muzzle, ears and hindfeet are shorter than those of the eastern barred bandicoot, and its tail is dark brown in colour.

Breeding and habitat

Breeding occurs from winter through to the end of summer. Gestation, as in the barred bandicoot is a mere 12 days. Litter size, as in the barred bandicoot, is 1-4, with old females usually producing the larger litters. Three or litters may be reared each year. Longevity is no more than three years.

The species is widespread but prefers areas with low ground cover.Such habitat is often maintained through regular burning. During the day it rests on the ground in a nest of grasses and leaf litter.

Behaviour

The species is nocturnal and solitary. The diet consists of insects and their larvae, underground fungi, worms, lizards and berries. When foraging, it digs characeristic conical holes with its well-clawed front feet.

The brown bandicoot is relatively common in suitable habitat and its status appears to be secure. It is wholly protected.