Our Latest News

Overland Track re-opens for walkers

02/02/2016

The Parks and Wildlife Service has advised that the Overland Track will re-open to bushwalkers as of Wednesday morning, 3 February 2016.More

Join in World Wetlands Day celebrations

28/01/2016

The Tamar Island Wetlands Centre will host a range of free activities on Tuesday 2 February 2016 to celebrate World Wetlands Day.More

Major fire fighting effort protecting public and state's important values

27/01/2016

The Parks and Wildlife Service General Manager Peter Mooney has acknowledged the efforts of Department staff, Tasmania Fire Service, volunteers and interstate firefighters who are continuing to undertake a major effort to protect values and infrastructureMore

White-footed Dunnart, Sminthopsis leucopus

Perhaps the least well-known of the Tasmanian marsupials is the tiny white-footed dunnart. This small (20-30 grams) carnivorous marsupial is one of a dozen or so described species of dunnart occuring in Australia.

Confined to Tasmania and the extreme south east coast of mainland Australia, the white-footed dunnart is found in a variety of habitats, ranging from rainforest, open forest and dry coastal heath. It also occurs on Flinders Island.

It is nocturnal and feeds on invertebrates, lizards. During daylight hours, the animal rests in tree hollows, rotting logs, wood piles and other such sites. Individuals are often only noticed after hollowed trees have been cut down - revealing the importance of hollow trees for this and numerous other species.

Birth occurs in spring. Up to eight young are born (there are eight teats).

The white-footed dunnart is presumed to be secure, largely on the basis of the wide variety of habitats in which it is able to occur. However, insufficient information is available to form an accurate assessment of its conservation status.