Our Latest News

Draft Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan

15/01/2015

The Tasmanian Government has today released a draft of the updated Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan.More

New sign celebrates the Overland Track experience

14/01/2015

In the 1960s, visitor information signs at Lake St Clair warned of no trapping, hunting, shooting, picking shrubs, cutting timber and grazing stock. Times have changed, with a new sign installation helping Overland Track walkers to celebrate their walk.More

Overland trek guide for young adventurers

14/01/2015

Of the 8000 people who tackle the world-famous Overland Track each year, almost one in ten is under 18 years old. A new publication from the Parks and Wildlife Service recognises that the experience is different for children.More

White-footed Dunnart, Sminthopsis leucopus

Perhaps the least well-known of the Tasmanian marsupials is the tiny white-footed dunnart. This small (20-30 grams) carnivorous marsupial is one of a dozen or so described species of dunnart occuring in Australia.

Confined to Tasmania and the extreme south east coast of mainland Australia, the white-footed dunnart is found in a variety of habitats, ranging from rainforest, open forest and dry coastal heath. It also occurs on Flinders Island.

It is nocturnal and feeds on invertebrates, lizards. During daylight hours, the animal rests in tree hollows, rotting logs, wood piles and other such sites. Individuals are often only noticed after hollowed trees have been cut down - revealing the importance of hollow trees for this and numerous other species.

Birth occurs in spring. Up to eight young are born (there are eight teats).

The white-footed dunnart is presumed to be secure, largely on the basis of the wide variety of habitats in which it is able to occur. However, insufficient information is available to form an accurate assessment of its conservation status.