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Update on work to restore access to flood-affected sites

23/11/2016

The Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) is continuing repair work to restore access to sites affected by the June flood event.More

Maria Island ferry service will unlock tourism opportunities

22/11/2016

The Tasmanian Government has secured a new, year-round regular passenger ferry service to Maria Island National Park, which will help the island fulfil its potential to be one of the state's best tourism attractions.More

Replacement of facilities at Lake Tahune

21/11/2016

A tender has been advertised for the demolition and replacement of the hut and toilet facilities at Lake Tahune on the Frenchmans Cap walking track.More

Carnivorous marsupials

The family Dasyuridae includes the well-known Tasmanian devil, eastern quolls (native cats), spotted-tailed quolls (tiger cats) and antechinuses (marsupial mice). The closely-related Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine, also a carnivorous marsupial, is classified in its own family, Thylacinidae.

Over forty species have been described from Australia and New Guinea. Seven occur in Tasmania:


The carnivorous marsupials are among the most impressive of hunting mammals. However, their smaller size, nocturnal habits and cryptic behaviour often leaves them overshadowed in the popular imagination by the conspicuous carnivores of Africa and Asia, such as leopards, tigers and lions.

As with all marsupials, the carnivorous species possess a pouch, although in some species, the pouch is little more than a mere fold. Typically, the young are carried within the pouch until such time that they are literally being dragged along the ground while the mother hunts. At this stage, the young are generally left in a den (such as a hollow log) while the mother hunts.

Although most of the members of this family are small, about the size of a rat, Tasmania has the distinction of being home to the four largest carnivorous marsupials in the world.