Our Latest News

Visitor safety under the spotlight in new walker safety video

16/04/2018

Visitor safety in Tasmania's national parks and reserves has received a major investment with a suite of projects, including a new feature video on bushwalking preparation and safety.More

Draft Frenchmans Cap Recreation Zone Plan 2018

12/04/2018

The Parks and Wildlife Service has released the Draft Recreation Zone Plan 2018 for the Frenchmans Cap area.More

Redeveloped Lake Tahune Hut now open

12/04/2018

A locally designed and built, energy-efficient and sustainable hut is now welcoming bushwalkers at Lake Tahune on the Frenchmans Cap Track in the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.More

Tasman National Park

Wildlife

Mammals

A range of mammals occur within the Tasman National Park. Larger herbivores such as the Tasmanian pademelon, Bennetts wallaby and wombats have increased in numbers in response to the development of pastures around the park boundary.

In the 1930s both the Tasmanian devil and eastern quoll were reported as being more widespread than present. Both species occur in the park, but it is probable that they are in small populations within a limited distribution. The Tasmanian bettong and potoroo are found in the drier regions of the park.

Dusky antechinus, swamp antechinus, eastern barred and southern brown bandicoots, all four possums, rodents such as swamp and water rats and long-tailed mouse, as well as seven species of bat have been recorded.

The surrounding marine environment also is home to seals. The Australian fur seal occurs along the coastline of the park and has hauling grounds at Cape Hauy, Hippolyte Rocks, Cape Pillar and Cape Raoul. Leopard and elephant seals have been observed in the waters and rocks off the Tasman National Park. Other common marine animals include cetaceans, such as the common and bottlenosed dolphin and the pilot, southern right and humpback whales.

Birds

Bird life in the Park is rich due to the variety of habitat. Fairy penguins breed within the park. Beach breeding birds use the sandy beaches and dunes in the Park. This includes the hooded plover Thinornis rubricollis which is vulnerable nationally and requires monitoring in Tasmania. Such species are readily disturbed and are highly vulnerable to impacts caused by the use of recreational vehicles on beaches.

The Park is the principal foraging habitat for at least one pair of the endangered Tasmanian wedge-tailed eagle. The walking tracks along the cliff edges often provide spectacular views of white-bellied sea eagles.

Reptiles and Amphibians

All three species of Tasmanian land snakes have been recorded in the Park. These are the tiger snake, copperhead, and white-lipped whipsnake . Nine species of lizards are recorded as well as six of the elevenfrog species occurring in Tasmania.

Fish

There are several permanent streams in the Park and these carry populations of native fish. Nine species of fish have been recorded including two species native to Tasmania, the Tasmanian smelt and Tasmanian Whitebait have been recorded.