Our Latest News

Repairing the infrastructure of Tasmania's parks

19/08/2016

The flood and storm events in June and July of this year had a significant impact on Tasmania's iconic national parks and reserves, and the current damage bill is expected to exceed $6.4 million.More

Festival of Bright Ideas

05/08/2016

As part of the celebration of the centenary of Tasmania's national parks, and in conjunction with National Science Week, a four day community event showcasing science, culture, food, tourism, music, innovation and health is being held on the West Coast.More

Join us for the Power of Parks forum at Launceston

22/07/2016

Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) in partnership with the University of Tasmania is exploring The Power of Parks through a series of UTAS public forums celebrating the benefits that parks and reserves provide to Tasmania's overall identify.More

Waterhouse Conservation Area

Introduction

The Waterhouse Conservation Area in Tasmania's north-east contains many wetland communities, including three major permanent deep-water lagoons - Blackmans Lagoon and Big Waterhouse and Little Waterhouse lakes.

Little Waterhouse Lake is listed under the Ramsar Convention as an internationally significant wetland. It is a very productive lake, supporting a high diversity of species, including species of particular conservation significance such as the rare Wolfia australis, the smallest flowering plant in the world.

Extensive, relict dune systems formed during the Ice Age can be seen in the north of the reserve extending from Croppies Points through to Tomahawk Beach.

The Waterhouse Conservation Area encompasses a diverse range of vegetation communities, including one of the largest areas of heathland on the north-east coast, a vegetation community which has been greatly reduced in extent since European settlement.

These diverse habitats support a rich fauna. Nine threatened species of bird and at least three, and possibly four, of Tasmania’s six species of threatened mammals are found in the reserve, as is a rare freshwater fish - the dwarf galaxias - and the vulnerable green and golden frog. Blackmans Lagoon and its feeder creeks constitute probably the single most important site in the State for the green and golden frog.

Waterhouse is popular place for camping, with several sites available. Other popular uses of the reserve include hunting, wildlife viewing, fishing, and recreational vehicle use.