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Encounter Maria Island

20/10/2017

Encounter Maria Island's new ferry Osprey V, that will allow even more visitors to enjoy one of the State's best tourism attractions, was launched today.More

Progress on Cradle Mountain Master Plan

19/10/2017

An important milestone in the Cradle Mountain Master Plan project has been reached following a competitive tender process, with Cumulus Studio chosen to design the Cradle Mountain gateway precinct and the Dove Lake viewing shelter.More

Exciting new proposal for Tasmania's South East Cape

16/10/2017

Award-winning local tourism operator Ian Johnstone can now progress a new project to lease and licence negotiations under the Tourism Opportunities in Tasmania's National Parks, Reserves and Crown Land process.More

Tasman Peninsula Dusky Antechinus, (Antechinus vandycki sp. nov.)

Photograph by Gary Cranitch, QM
Queensland University of Technology researchers have recently discovered a new species of Antechinus near Port Arthur on the Tasman Peninsula. The Tasman Peninsula Dusky Antechinus (Antechinus vandycki sp. nov.) is considered a third Tasmanian species of Antechinus, distinct from the Dusky Antechinus (Antechinus swainsonii) and the Swamp Antechinus (Antechinus minimus).

Although the first species of Antechinus, a Tasmanian specimen of Antechinus swainsonii, was described as early as 1840, in recent decades molecular and genetic studies have expanded the number of distinct species of mammals in general; in the genus Antechuinus, as many as thirteen species have been described.

Following a taxonomic revision, detailed descriptions of the new, endemic species A. vandycki sp. nov. have been published. The study is based on a small sample size and the distribution, abundance, and habitat requirements are largely unknown.

The same study also suggests the Dusky AntechinusA. swainsonii, now be recognised as endemic to Tasmania.

The Tasman Peninsula Dusky Antechinus is very similar in external appearance to the Dusky Antechinus, making the two species very difficult to distinguish in the field. It weighs less than 100 grams and is about 13cm from the snout to the base of the tail. It is a deep, dark grey on the back and lighter grey on the underside with brownish highlights on the body.  It is not yet known whether the two species co-occur.

As with the Dusky and Swamp Antechinuses, the new species also displays a remarkable, frenzied mating ritual which leads the death of the males within three weeks of copulation, leaving a population comprised almost entirely of females and their offspring.

If confined to the Tasman Peninsula, the species is likely to be considered rare on the basis of its limited distribution. The Tasman Peninsula Dusky Antechinus is found in mixed wet sclerophyll forestAs there is only a limited amount of such habitat on the Tasman Peninsula, potential threats to the species include loss of habitat and predation by feral cats, which are common on the Peninsula.