Our Latest News

Upgrade for Wineglass Bay Track

15/05/2017

Freycinet is the State's most visited national park, with 286,000 visitors in 2016, with about 34 per cent of visitors to Freycinet walking to the Wineglass Bay beach.More

New ecotourism experience at Narawntapu

15/05/2017

Tasmania's parks and reserves are extraordinary and the Hodgman Liberal Government's Expression of Interest (EOI) process is allowing the world to experience it through sensitive and appropriate developments in our national parks and World Heritage areas.More

International award for Three Capes Track

12/05/2017

The Three Capes Track has been recognized internationally, with the experience winning the International Planning and Design Award by American Trails at the International Trails Symposium in Dayton, Ohio.More

Tasman National Park

Highlights

Spectacular Coastal Scenery

Tasman Island from Cape Pillar

Tasman Island from
Cape Pillar

The dramatic sea cliffs along the Tasman Peninsula are among the highest and most spectacular in Australia. These columnar dolerite cliffs are outstanding examples of a rock type which is very rare on mainland Australia.

Various interesting rock formations can also be discovered in the park. The Blowhole, Devils Kitchen and Tasman's Arch are easily accessible by car at the northern end of the park. Waterfall Bay, also accessible by car, offers a spectacular view across the cliff-lined bay to a waterfall which, after rain, plummets straight into the sea.

Wildlife

Seals, penguins, dolphins and whales are all seen at various times, with Australian fur seals using the rugged coastline for breeding and resting, and fairy penguins nesting along the foreshore.

The waters just off the coast contain forests of Macrocystis kelp, which is one of the fastest growing organisms on Earth. These spectacular underwater forests are among the most beautiful in the world, and are highly-valued by divers.

Sea birds including gannets and terns frequent the coastline, while the forest harbours smaller birds such as fairy-wrens, scarlet robins, honeyeaters and pardalotes. Tasman National Park also contains a number of nesting raptors including the endangered wedge-tailed eagle and the white-bellied sea eagle. The area around Mt Spaulding, near Tunnel Bay, is also is a recognised habitat of the endangered swift parrot.

Most mammals are only seen at night, or around dawn or dusk. Campers often become aware of this through the nocturnal raids of brush-tail possums!

Further details of the wildlife found in the park can be found on our Wildlife of Tasman National Park page.

Rare Plants

The park also contains a number of plant species found nowhere else in the world, including some beautiful and rare euphrasias. Three rare species of euphrasia, shown below, are found only in coastal heath communities in Tasman National Park. The park also marks the southern most extension of a number of east coast plants including the Oyster Bay pine, Richea dracophylla and Eucalyptus johnstonii.

Euphrasia amphisysepala E. sp. fabula E. phragmostoma

Three species of euphrasia, confined to Tasman National Park. From left to right, Euphrasia
amphisysepala, E. sp. 'fabula' and E. phragmostoma.