Our Latest News

Replacement of Cockle Creek bridge

09/07/2014

Visitors to Cockle Creek in Tasmania's Far South are advised that the Cockle Creek bridge will be closed from approximately 14 July to the end of August 2014, while the old bridge is removed and a replacement bridge is constructed.More

Firewood theft can be costly

08/07/2014

The Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) is warning that unlawfully cutting trees for firewood on reserved land can be a costly exercise and that remote cameras are being used to catch offenders.More

Caretakers wanted for island's historic site

08/07/2014

Fancy spending a few weeks at the fascinating Quarantine Station on Bruny Island? The Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) and Wildcare Inc Friends of Bruny Island Quarantine Station are seeking volunteer caretakers for the station for the 2014/15 summer.More

Tasman National Park

Introduction

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Tasman National Park protects diverse forest and spectacular coastline from Cape Surville to Waterfall Bay and Fortescue Bay; and from Cape Hauy to Cape Pillar and Cape Raoul. The park incorporates several off-shore islands, including Fossil Island, Hippolyte Rocks and Tasman Island.

It is an area of great beauty and natural diversity, including some of the most stunning coastal scenery anywhere in Australia. Not suprisingly, the park offers some of the best coastal walks in the country. Many interesting rock formations can be found along the coastline, while the southern end of the park has some of the highest and most spectacular sea cliffs in Australia. The park is also home to a wide range of land and marine animals, and several species of rare plant.

The Tasman National Park was proclaimed under the Regional Forest Agreement (RFA) in April 1999. The RFA identified the area for reservation for a number of reasons, including its high conservation and scenic values.

An exciting project has been proposed for Tasman National Park by the Parks and Wildlife Service - The Three Capes Track. The feasibility of the development of the walk as an iconic bushwalking experience and its impact socially, environmentally and economically are being further investigated through various mechanisms. If you would like to read about where the project is up to at the moment please click here