Our Latest News

Draft Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan

15/01/2015

The Tasmanian Government has today released a draft of the updated Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan.More

New sign celebrates the Overland Track experience

14/01/2015

In the 1960s, visitor information signs at Lake St Clair warned of no trapping, hunting, shooting, picking shrubs, cutting timber and grazing stock. Times have changed, with a new sign installation helping Overland Track walkers to celebrate their walk.More

Overland trek guide for young adventurers

14/01/2015

Of the 8000 people who tackle the world-famous Overland Track each year, almost one in ten is under 18 years old. A new publication from the Parks and Wildlife Service recognises that the experience is different for children.More

Narawntapu National Park

Introduction

Narawntapu Icon
Narawntapu National Park (formerly known as Asbestos Range National Park) is a place of peace for people and wildlife alike. It stretches from the low coastal ranges to the long Bass Strait beaches, and includes an historic farm, a complex of inlets, small islands, headlands, wetlands, dunes and lagoons, all with an amazing variety of plants and animals.

 

Small quantities of asbestos, among other minerals, were once mined in areas beyond the Asbestos Range, but never actually in the Asbestos Range itself - despite the earlier name of the park. Hence the name change.

Dubbed the "Serengeti of Tasmania", Narawntapu is one of the best places in Tasmania to view wildlife. The park boasts a rich array of easily observed animals that come out in the evening to graze on the grasslands. Some of the animals that you may see include the Forester kangaroo, Bennetts wallaby and common wombat. You may even catch a glimpse of a Tasmanian devil.

Whether you're here for water activities or wildlife; bushwalking or beachcombing; picnicking or camping, you'll find Narawntapu a special place.