Our Latest News

Congratulations to Working on Country graduates

22/04/2016

A partnership program between the Tasmanian Government and the Australian Government has seen four Working on Country Aboriginal rangers gain professional qualifications in land management.More

Mount Field centenary celebrations

14/04/2016

Two of Tasmania's most loved parks, Freycinet and Mount Field, were first reserved on 29 August 1916 and this milestone is being celebrated during the year with a variety of events.
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Big Green Island rat eradication under way

24/03/2016

The first stage of a project to eradicate rats from Big Green Island and provide increased protection for its biodiversity values, is under way, following the installation of more than 2,100 bait stations using the latest digital technology.More

Mole Creek Karst National Park

Introduction

Mole Creek Icon
The Mole Creek Karst National Park was declared in 1996 to provide protection for some of the finest and most visited cave systems in the State, including Marakoopa and King Solomons Cave. Both caves are open to the public, and provide the opportunity to take a deeper look into the fascinating world of 'karst' landscapes.

 

The Mole Creek area is renowned for its caves. Marakoopa and King Solomons Caves are but two caves in an area that contains over 300 known caves and sinkholes. Other typical karst features in this area include gorges and large underground streams and springs.

Both caves are home to a range of fascinating animals which have evolved features which allow them to adapt to their lightless environments. The glow-worm display in Marakoopa Cave is the largest you'll see in any public access cave anywhere in Australia. For the visitor, the Mole Creek Karst National Park offers a range of activities. Although guided tours of the caves will be high on your agenda, don't miss the opportunity to take a short walk through the beautiful forests in which these caves occur.