Our Latest News

Wielangta Road bridge construction under way

20/02/2017

Work has begun this week on the replacement of four bridges on Wielangta Road as part of a $1.2 million project to upgrade the road.More

Improving tourism assets at Heritage Landing

03/02/2017

The iconic Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Gordon River cruise tourism experience is set for a major upgrade with facilities at Heritage Landing to be upgraded.More

Opportunities for Aboriginal trainee rangers

30/01/2017

The Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) is seeking applications for six Aboriginal trainee rangers as part of a partnership program between the Tasmanian Government and the Australian Government's Working on Country program.More

Mole Creek Karst National Park

Introduction

Mole Creek Icon
The Mole Creek Karst National Park was declared in 1996 to provide protection for some of the finest and most visited cave systems in the State, including Marakoopa and King Solomons Cave. Both caves are open to the public, and provide the opportunity to take a deeper look into the fascinating world of 'karst' landscapes.

 

The Mole Creek area is renowned for its caves. Marakoopa and King Solomons Caves are but two caves in an area that contains over 300 known caves and sinkholes. Other typical karst features in this area include gorges and large underground streams and springs.

Both caves are home to a range of fascinating animals which have evolved features which allow them to adapt to their lightless environments. The glow-worm display in Marakoopa Cave is the largest you'll see in any public access cave anywhere in Australia. For the visitor, the Mole Creek Karst National Park offers a range of activities. Although guided tours of the caves will be high on your agenda, don't miss the opportunity to take a short walk through the beautiful forests in which these caves occur.