Our Latest News

Overland Track re-opens for walkers

02/02/2016

The Parks and Wildlife Service has advised that the Overland Track will re-open to bushwalkers as of Wednesday morning, 3 February 2016.More

Join in World Wetlands Day celebrations

28/01/2016

The Tamar Island Wetlands Centre will host a range of free activities on Tuesday 2 February 2016 to celebrate World Wetlands Day.More

Major fire fighting effort protecting public and state's important values

27/01/2016

The Parks and Wildlife Service General Manager Peter Mooney has acknowledged the efforts of Department staff, Tasmania Fire Service, volunteers and interstate firefighters who are continuing to undertake a major effort to protect values and infrastructureMore

Mole Creek Karst National Park

Introduction

Mole Creek Icon
The Mole Creek Karst National Park was declared in 1996 to provide protection for some of the finest and most visited cave systems in the State, including Marakoopa and King Solomons Cave. Both caves are open to the public, and provide the opportunity to take a deeper look into the fascinating world of 'karst' landscapes.

 

The Mole Creek area is renowned for its caves. Marakoopa and King Solomons Caves are but two caves in an area that contains over 300 known caves and sinkholes. Other typical karst features in this area include gorges and large underground streams and springs.

Both caves are home to a range of fascinating animals which have evolved features which allow them to adapt to their lightless environments. The glow-worm display in Marakoopa Cave is the largest you'll see in any public access cave anywhere in Australia. For the visitor, the Mole Creek Karst National Park offers a range of activities. Although guided tours of the caves will be high on your agenda, don't miss the opportunity to take a short walk through the beautiful forests in which these caves occur.