Our Latest News

Repairing the infrastructure of Tasmania's parks

19/08/2016

The flood and storm events in June and July of this year had a significant impact on Tasmania's iconic national parks and reserves, and the current damage bill is expected to exceed $6.4 million.More

Festival of Bright Ideas

05/08/2016

As part of the celebration of the centenary of Tasmania's national parks, and in conjunction with National Science Week, a four day community event showcasing science, culture, food, tourism, music, innovation and health is being held on the West Coast.More

Join us for the Power of Parks forum at Launceston

22/07/2016

Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) in partnership with the University of Tasmania is exploring The Power of Parks through a series of UTAS public forums celebrating the benefits that parks and reserves provide to Tasmania's overall identify.More

Kent Group National Park

Introduction

 

Lighthouse at Deal IslandLighthouse at Deal Island
(Photograph copyright PWS)

The six islands and islets of the Kent Group comprise Tasmania's northernmost national park - located about 55 kilometres north-west of Flinders Island and approximately the same distance from Wilsons Promontory in Victoria.

The Kent Group National Park consists of three main Islands, Deal, Erith and Dover. The total land area of the park is 2,374 hectares, while the largest of the islands - Deal - has an area of 1,576 hectares.

The islands and islets have a rich Aboriginal cultural heritage with human occupation of the area estimated to date back between 8,000 and 13,000 years. The islands also have a long European history. The first European to see the islands was Mathew Flinders in 1798, during a voyage to Preservation Island to rescue survivors of the Sydney Cove Wreck.

The islands were used for extensive fur seal sealing, for a period of about 50 years. A lighthouse station was built on Deal Island in 1848. The island has not had permanent inhabitants since 1992 when the lighthouse was deactivated, although volunteer caretakers have since lived on the island.