Our Latest News

Overland Track bookings open with a rush

18/07/2017

Tasmania's iconic world-renowned bushwalks are a key driver behind the boom in visitor numbers to the state, and bookings for the Overland Track walking season have opened with a rush for the peak summer period.More

Works under way to improve safety at Bruny Island Neck

07/07/2017

Bruny Island Main Road at The Neck will soon be a safer environment for road users, visitors and wildlife, with road and car park improvements starting this week.More

Productive summer on the Overland Track

27/06/2017

The Overland Track's summer works program has seen gains in sanitation, historic heritage conservation works and track improvements.More

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Crown Land?
Are council rates payable for marine facilities?
Can I sell motor vehicles, or other goods (such as firewood), on Crown land or on roadsides?
Can I place a sign on Crown land or on roadsides?
Will the Crown contribute to boundary fencing?
Can I hunt or shoot on Crown land?
What is a Public Reserve?
What is a Reserved Road?
Can I purchase Crown land?
Can I lease or obtain a licence to use Crown land?
What is the difference between a Crown lease and a licence?
How do I transfer a lease or licence?
How do I cancel my Crown land lease or licence?
Can I camp on crown land?

Information about flood relief and salvaging after the floods can be found on DPIPWE's Flood Information page.


The answers provided with these frequently asked questions are intentionally broad and general. Detailed and specific information should be sought from Crown Land Services. No liability is accepted for action taken as a result of this information.

What is Crown land?

Crown land is ‘public land’ owned and managed by the State Government on behalf of the Crown (and people of Tasmania). It includes Public Reserves, school and hospital sites, and the verges of most roads in Tasmania.

The Parks & Wildlife Service manages Crown land reserved under the Nature Conservation Act 2002.  Permanent timber production zone land is managed by Forestry Tasmania under the Forest Management Act 2013. Other Government Departments manage some Crown properties such as hospitals, police stations, and schools.

Crown Land Services manages the remainder of Crown land in accordance Crown Lands Act 1976.  In a broad sense, the Crown Lands Act 1976 is a set of rules on what can and can’t be done on Crown land and how Crown land is sold, leased or made available for use under licence.


Are council rates payable for marine facilities?

Under the Local Government Act 1993, marine facilities on Crown land are exempt from some forms of council rates. Questions about rates and charges should be directed to your local Council.


Can I sell motor vehicles, or other goods (such as firewood), on Crown land or on roadsides?

No.  The sale of vehicles and other goods is not permitted on Crown land or on roadsides.


Can I place a sign on Crown land or on roadsides?

Placing a sign on Crown land or on roadsides is not permitted without first obtaining authority from Crown Land Services and planning approval from Council.  Find out more on the Authority to Undertake Works page.


Will the Crown contribute to boundary fencing?

Generally the Crown is exempt from contributing to the cost of boundary fencing under the Boundary Fences Act 1908. Some Government Departments contribute on a ‘no liability basis’ to the cost of boundary fencing adjacent to Government owned residential housing and other Government buildings where security of Government property is an important issue.


Can I hunt or shoot on Crown land?

Enquires about hunting and shooting can be directed to the District Offices of the Parks and Wildlife Service.

The Crown Lands Regulations 2001 govern hunting and the use of firearms on Crown land Public Reserves. Enquiries should also be made to the local office of the Parks and Wildlife Service before hunting on, or taking firearms into, Public Reserves.


What is a Public Reserve?

A Public Reserve is Crown land reserved under section 8 of the Crown Lands Act 1976. While Crown land along rivers and coastal areas are often Public Reserves, other Crown land, such as sporting grounds, parks, and picnic facilities may also be Public Reserves. Activities in Public Reserves are governed by the Crown Lands Regulations 2011, which are effectively the set of rules for the public using those lands.


What is a Reserved Road?

Corridors of Crown land were historically retained by the Crown, largely at the time of subdivision, to provide for potential future access to each subdivided lot.  These Crown land corridors (variously noted on plans and titles as ‘Reserved Road’, ‘Road’, ‘Street’, ‘Esplanade’ etc.) are often simply known as Reserved Roads.

Unless a Reserved Road has become a public road managed by local government or the Department of Infrastructure, Energy and Resources, these Crown land corridors have no status as a public road.  Reserved Roads that have not become a public road are managed like any other Crown land under the Crown Lands Act 1976.  Land owners who wish to use such Reserved Roads for access to their properties, or for other purposes, must first apply to Crown Land Services.


Can I purchase Crown land?

Crown land identified as surplus to Government needs, and meeting minimum lot size under local Council Planning Schemes, is usually offered for sale by public auction through local real estate firms.

Properties sold on the open market in this way are listed by the Department of Treasury and Finance on its property sales website.  Minor sales are listed on the Crown Land for Sale page.  Any queries regarding the sale of a listed property should be directed to the appointed real estate agent or the contact indicated on the website listing.

However, where Crown land does not meet the required minimum lot size, or it cannot be titled as a separate lot (such as lengths of Reserved Road), adjoining landowners can apply to purchase it for adhesion to their property.  Where there is only one adjoining owner available to purchase, land may be sold to that owner by private treaty; otherwise it may be tendered amongst adjoining landowners that are interested in purchase.

Crown land is sold at market value as determined by the Director-General of Lands (DGL).  When determining the sale price, the DGL must have regard to the costs of obtaining a title for the land, any improvements to the land (such as fencing), and the value of commercial quantities of standing timber on the land.

Crown land throughout the State was assessed by the Crown Land Assessment and Classification (CLAC) Project.  A CLAC ‘Consider for Sale’ recommendation means that the property has the potential to be sold. Whether or not it is sold will depend on a more detailed assessment.  Properties with natural or cultural values may be sold with a covenant to protect those values.

Find more information on purchasing Crown land on the Purchasing Crown Land page.


Can I lease or obtain a licence to use Crown land?

Crown Land Services issues leases and licences to individuals, community organisations and businesses for a broad range of activities on Crown land.  These agreements are administered by CLS as landlord on behalf of the Crown (and people of Tasmania).

Costs that may be associated with leasing or licensing Crown land include rental fees, valuation costs, survey costs, legal fees, public liability insurance, rates, and water and sewage charges.

New leases and licences are no longer granted for shack site purposes.

Find more information on Crown land leases and licences on the Leasing and Licensing page. 


    What is the difference between a Crown lease and a licence?

    Leases authorise the exclusive occupation of Crown land for a fixed-term and specified purpose. Generally, leases are issued where longer-term or commercial activities are proposed. Examples include marinas, community halls, caravan parks and sporting facilities.

    Licences are agreements that authorise the use or occupation of Crown land for a specified purpose. Licences, unlike leases, do not confer exclusive possession and are often issued for shared use of Crown land, such as shared access over Reserved Roads. Other example purposes include apiary (bee keeping), grazing, and private slipways and jetties.

    Find more information on Crown land leases and licences on the Leasing and Licensing page. 


    How do I transfer a lease or licence?

    To initiate a lease or licence transfer lodge a Transfer Request form together with the applicable fee.  Find out more about transferring Crown land agreements on the Transfer of Lease or Licence page.


    How do I cancel my Crown land lease or licence?

    Agreement holders wishing to cancel their Crown land agreement should lodge an Application to Cancel Crown Agreement form.


    Can I camp on Crown land?

    Camp sites on Crown land are generally marked with signs. Camping enquiries for Crown land should be directed to the District Offices of the Parks and Wildlife Service.


     

    Contact

    Crown Land Services
    Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service
    Department of Primary Industries Parks Water & Environment
    Level 8, Lands Building, 134 Macquarie Street Hobart
    GPO Box 44 Hobart TAS 7001

    General Enquiries Message Service: Ph. (03) 6233 6413

    A Crown Land Services Officer will contact you the next business day to discuss your enquiry.

    Email for appointments or enquiries: CLS.Enquiries@parks.tas.gov.au