Our Latest News

New lease of life for original lighthouse vents

15/05/2018

As part of the ongoing conservation of the Cape Bruny and Maatsuyker Island lighthouses, a team effort has been underway to restore the original bronze vents from the lighthouses' lantern rooms.More

Record visitor numbers at Highfield Historic Site

09/05/2018

Visitation numbers at Highfield Historic Site in Stanley have reached a record high, with 12,535 people visiting in the 12 months ending March 2018.More

Cradle Mountain shuttle bus tender awarded

08/05/2018

A new bus fleet featuring environmentally friendly technology and vehicles with improved accessibility and increased capacity will help to meet increasing visitor numbers following the awarding of the tender to McDermott Coaches.More

Kings Lomatia, Lomatia tasmanica

King's lomatia - the Oldest Plant Clone in the World?

Kings Holly

Recent research on an endangered species of Tasmanian plant has led to the discovery of what is thought to be the oldest known plant clone on Earth. Stands of genetically identical individuals of Lomatia tasmanica, or King's lomatia, have been estimated to be at least 43 000 years old.

King's lomatia, Lomatia tasmanica, is a highly endangered species of the family Proteaceae, found only in two tiny localities in the remote south-west of Tasmania. The total population comprises approximately 500 plants. The populations appear to be maintained vegetatively, by root suckering and coppice. One stand has spread over 1.2km, the second longest such clone in the world after the 2km long huckleberry (Gaylussacia brachycerium) clone in North America.Full details of the species is available on the Department of Primary Industries and Water's web site.