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Draft Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan

15/01/2015

The Tasmanian Government has today released a draft of the updated Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan.More

New sign celebrates the Overland Track experience

14/01/2015

In the 1960s, visitor information signs at Lake St Clair warned of no trapping, hunting, shooting, picking shrubs, cutting timber and grazing stock. Times have changed, with a new sign installation helping Overland Track walkers to celebrate their walk.More

Overland trek guide for young adventurers

14/01/2015

Of the 8000 people who tackle the world-famous Overland Track each year, almost one in ten is under 18 years old. A new publication from the Parks and Wildlife Service recognises that the experience is different for children.More

Kings Lomatia, Lomatia tasmanica

King's lomatia - the Oldest Plant Clone in the World?

Kings Holly

Recent research on an endangered species of Tasmanian plant has led to the discovery of what is thought to be the oldest known plant clone on Earth. Stands of genetically identical individuals of Lomatia tasmanica, or King's lomatia, have been estimated to be at least 43 000 years old.

King's lomatia, Lomatia tasmanica, is a highly endangered species of the family Proteaceae, found only in two tiny localities in the remote south-west of Tasmania. The total population comprises approximately 500 plants. The populations appear to be maintained vegetatively, by root suckering and coppice. One stand has spread over 1.2km, the second longest such clone in the world after the 2km long huckleberry (Gaylussacia brachycerium) clone in North America.Full details of the species is available on the Department of Primary Industries and Water's web site.