Our Latest News

Join us for the Power of Parks forum at Launceston

22/07/2016

Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) in partnership with the University of Tasmania is exploring The Power of Parks through a series of UTAS public forums celebrating the benefits that parks and reserves provide to Tasmania's overall identify.More

Shipwreck identified as the Viola

19/07/2016

Timber samples from a ship wrecked on Tasmania's East Coast nearly 160 years ago have been identified as the Canadian-built brig Viola.More

Prosecution for Stanley penguin deaths

15/07/2016

The Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) and the Circular Head Council have conducted a joint investigation after 18 little penguins were found dead near a rookery in Stanley on the State's North-West coast last week.More

Kings Lomatia, Lomatia tasmanica

King's lomatia - the Oldest Plant Clone in the World?

Kings Holly

Recent research on an endangered species of Tasmanian plant has led to the discovery of what is thought to be the oldest known plant clone on Earth. Stands of genetically identical individuals of Lomatia tasmanica, or King's lomatia, have been estimated to be at least 43 000 years old.

King's lomatia, Lomatia tasmanica, is a highly endangered species of the family Proteaceae, found only in two tiny localities in the remote south-west of Tasmania. The total population comprises approximately 500 plants. The populations appear to be maintained vegetatively, by root suckering and coppice. One stand has spread over 1.2km, the second longest such clone in the world after the 2km long huckleberry (Gaylussacia brachycerium) clone in North America.Full details of the species is available on the Department of Primary Industries and Water's web site.