Our Latest News

Horsetail Falls walk now open

15/11/2017

Visitors to the West Coast are in for some spectacular views on the new Horsetail Falls walk near Queenstown.More

Bruny Island Neck lookout re-opens

10/11/2017

The walkways and lookout at the Bruny Island Neck will re-open to the public today, following the completion of a new, larger car park that will provide improved access to the popular lookout.More

Maintaining vigilance with campfires

03/11/2017

Parks and Wildlife Service staff have thanked the many campers who have heeded the restrictions placed on campfires and pot fires, but ask that park and reserve visitors continue to take care while the fire risk remains high in certain areas of the State.More

Birds of Prey Education Resource

Wedge-Tailed Eagle

Year 1 Curriculum Links to Raptor Program

  • Living things have a variety of external features (Raptors have wings, beaks, claws and feathers) 
  • Living things live in different places where their needs are met (Some raptors fly at night others during the day, some live in forests some live in marsh lands) 
  • People use science in their daily lives, including when caring for their environment and living things (Raptors being rehabilitated in captivity for release) 
  • Use a range of methods to sort information, including drawings (drawing features of a raptor – what it needs to hunt) 
  • Represent and communicate observations and ideas in a variety of ways such as oral and written language, drawing and role play (raptor hunting games) 
  • · By the end of Year 1, students identify a range of habitats. They describe changes to things in their local environment and suggest how science helps people care for environments. (find out where raptors live and how can protect raptors)

Year 2 Curriculum Links to Raptor Program

  • Living things grow, change and have offspring similar to themselves (Raptors start as eggs and hatch into chicks then fledge and become adults) 
  • People use science in their daily lives, including when caring for their environment and living things (what scientists have learnt that raptors need in captivity, providing the right materials in pens and useful pens for flying in) 
  • By the end of Year 2, students describe changes to objects, materials and living things. (look at the life cycle of a raptor (bird and compare it with peoples)

Year 3 Curriculum Links to Raptor Program

  • Living things can be grouped on the basis of observable features and can be distinguished from non-living things (observe the features of a raptor, wings, feathers etc and compare it with a person’s – how do they breath, eat, walk/fly, then compare that with non living things like rocks) 
  • Science involves making predictions and describing patterns and relationships (Play raptor games to find out how raptors feed, hunt and different strategies, look at removal of their home to find out how it would affect them – musical chairs idea) 
  • Science knowledge helps people to understand the effect of their actions (pesticides and powerlines, cars driving too fast effect the survival of raptors) 
  • By the end of Year 3, students describe features common to living things (Basic anatomy of raptor and people to breath, eat, keep warm, have young etc). 
  • They describe how they can use science investigations to respond to questions and identify where people use science knowledge in their lives.(how carers and scientists have used knowledge about raptors to care for them in captivity)

Year 4 Curriculum Links to Raptor Program

  • Living things have life cycles (Life cycle of a Raptor) 
  • Living things, including plants and animals, depend on each other and the environment to survive (What a raptor needs to survive in the environment: prey, shelter, nest sites, habitat for prey)
  • Science knowledge helps people to understand the effect of their actions (Threats to raptors – collisions with cars, electrocution, loss of habitat, shooting, pollutants in the environment) 
  • By the end of Year 4, students can describe relationships that assist the survival of living things and sequence key stages in the life cycle of raptor. They describe situations where science understanding can influence their own and others’ actions on survival of raptors.

Year 5 Curriculum Links to Raptor Program

  • Living things have structural features and adaptations that help them to survive in their environment (weapons of mass destruction – the features of raptors) 
  • Important contributions to the advancement of science have been made by people from a range of cultures. (Scientists and wildlife carers have used science to learn how to care for and rehabilitate raptors and reduce their threats in the wild). 
  • By the end of Year 5, students they analyse how the form of living things enables them to function in their environments (Raptor adaptations: flying, beaks, talons, feathers and the way they use them to catch prey). Students discuss how scientific developments have affected people’s lives and how science knowledge develops from many people’s contributions (Scientists and wildlife carers have learnt how to rehabilitate injured raptors, adaptations of power lines to reduce threats, changes to forestry practices)

Year 6 Curriculum Links to Raptor Program

  • The growth and survival of living things are affected by the physical conditions of their environment (Raptors require a range of physical and biological conditions to survive – climate change will impact on the physical conditions of the environment)

Year 7 Curriculum Links to Raptor Program

  • There are differences within and between groups of organisms; classification helps organise this diversity (Compare and classify different raptors based on their hunting methods) 
  • Interactions between organisms can be described in terms of food chains and food webs; human activity can affect these interactions (Develop a raptor food chain/web look at how humans can affect these) 
  • Scientific knowledge changes as new evidence becomes available, and some scientific discoveries have significantly changed people’s understanding of the world (Look at how wind farms, forestry and pesticides interfere with raptor survival) 
  • Science knowledge can develop through collaboration and connecting ideas across the disciplines of science (Understanding about how pesticides and other chemicals are concentrated through food chains – bioaccumulation, lethal levels and using work of biologists to learn about raptors and carers. Also look at work of foresters and scientists to solve raptor threats. Look at solutions to raptor threats) 
  • Predict the effect of environmental changes on feeding relationships and classify and organise diverse organisms based on observable differences (Comparing different raptor species with features). Students describe situations where scientific knowledge from different science disciplines has been used to solve a real-world problem. They explain how the solution was viewed by, and impacted on, different groups in society. (Forestry, wind farms, pollution and people’s behavior and how they can be mitigated to protect raptors)

Year 8 Curriculum Links to Raptor Program

  • Multi-cellular organisms contain systems of organs that carry out specialised functions that enable them to survive and reproduce (wings, flight and other raptor strategies). 
  • Scientific knowledge changes as new evidence becomes available, and some scientific discoveries have significantly changed people’s understanding of the world (As for Year 7 – how this impacts on raptors) 
  • Science and technology contribute to finding solutions to a range of contemporary issues; these solutions may impact on other areas of society and involve ethical considerations (The impact of wind farms, forestry and pesticides on raptor survival) 
  • Science understanding influences the development of practices in areas of human activity such as industry, agriculture and marine and terrestrial resource management (The impact of wind farms, forestry and pesticides on raptor survival) 
  • People use understanding and skills from across the disciplines of science in their occupations (How raptor experts have informed forestry, Aurora and other departments on how to utilize resources so they have less impact on raptors) 
  • Reflect on the method used to investigate a question or solve a problem, including evaluating the quality of the data collected, and identify improvements to the method (nest sites for wedge-tailed eagles, pesticides in raptors affecting eggs and collecting data on wind farms) 
  • Communicate ideas, findings and solutions to problems using scientific language and representations using digital technologies as appropriate (Develop a threat abatement plan for raptors) 
  • By the end of Year 8, students analyse the relationship between structure and function at cell, organ and body system levels.(Comparing different types of raptors). Students examine the different science knowledge used in occupations. They explain how evidence has led to an improved understanding of a scientific idea and describe situations in which scientists collaborated to generate solutions to contemporary problems. (Forestry, agriculture, wind energy)

Year 9 Curriculum Links to Raptor Program

  • Multi-cellular organisms rely on coordinated and interdependent internal systems to respond to environmental changes (Look at flight in raptors) 
  • Ecosystems consist of communities of interdependent organisms and abiotic components (Learn about raptors as part of an ecosystem, their requirements and needs and how this is affected by changes, learn about threatened species) 
  • Scientific understanding, including models and theories, are contestable and are refined over time through a process of review by the scientific community (Raptors as threatened species) 
  • Advances in scientific understanding often rely on developments in technology and technological advances are often linked to scientific discoveries (using GPS for recording nest sites and videocam monitoring of captive raptors helps us learn more about raptors) 
  • The values and needs of contemporary society can influence the focus of scientific research (use of GPS, video cameras and other methods to enable Society to live with wildlife) 
  • By the end of Year 9, students analyse how biological systems function and respond to external factors They describe social and technological factors that have influenced scientific developments and predict how future applications of science and technology may affect people’s lives. (Ecology of raptors, raptors as threatened species, bioaccumulation)

Year 10 Curriculum Links to Raptor Program

  • The theory of evolution by natural selection explains the diversity of living things and is supported by a range of scientific evidence (comparing different raptor species)  
  • Scientific understanding, including models and theories, are contestable and are refined over time through a process of review by the scientific community (Researching the threats to raptors, how they are portrayed in media and by governments and scientists) 
  • The values and needs of contemporary society can influence the focus of scientific research (Threats to raptors as opposed to the needs of people, energy, forestry and agriculture) 
  • Plan, select and use appropriate investigation methods, including field work and laboratory experimentation, to collect reliable data; assess risk and address ethical issues associated with these methods (Work out how many of injuries to raptors at Refuge Centre could have been prevented by changing people’s behaviour) 
  • Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence (Work out needs for raptors to survive, nest types etc) 
  • By the end of Year 10, students evaluate the evidence for scientific theories that explain the origin of the universe and the diversity of life on Earth. They explain the processes that underpin heredity and evolution. Students analyse how the models and theories they use have developed over time and discuss the factors that prompted their review. (Students use the different characteristics of raptors to learn about how all species develop their own niche)

Raptor Resources 

The following printouts are available to assist the Raptor Education Program