Our Latest News

Draft Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan

15/01/2015

The Tasmanian Government has today released a draft of the updated Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan.More

New sign celebrates the Overland Track experience

14/01/2015

In the 1960s, visitor information signs at Lake St Clair warned of no trapping, hunting, shooting, picking shrubs, cutting timber and grazing stock. Times have changed, with a new sign installation helping Overland Track walkers to celebrate their walk.More

Overland trek guide for young adventurers

14/01/2015

Of the 8000 people who tackle the world-famous Overland Track each year, almost one in ten is under 18 years old. A new publication from the Parks and Wildlife Service recognises that the experience is different for children.More

Ross Female Factory

Introduction

Catherine Bartley, a female convict

Catherine Bartley,
a female convict
(Archives Office of Tasmania)

Ross Female Factory Site, built in the early 1840's, incarcerated female convicts from 1847 to 1854. It was one of four female factories established in Tasmania. The name, "Female Factory" was abbreviated from the British institutional title "Manufactory", and referred to the prisons' role as a Work House.

Today, the Ross Female Factory is a protected Historic Site, managed by the Parks & Wildlife Service and the Tasmanian Wool Centre of Ross. Open to the public, the Overseer's Cottage contains a display on the history of this unique convict site, including a model of the Female Factory in 1851.

Although little architecture remains above the ground, Ross Factory is the most archaeologically intact female convict site in Australia. (See the Ross Female Factory Archaeological Project for further details).