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Lisdillon Salt Works

Visitor's Guide

Image Map of Lisdillon Salt Works

1. Salt Works

This building consisted of two large rectangular structures, built on different levels with connecting stairs. The upper section was the salt store whilst the room below housed the boilers. The lower level was most probably open to the elements on the eastern side to allow for the escape of steam and to facilitate the stacking of firewood to feed the boilers. Underfloor flues carried the warm air from the boilers to a chimney at the rear of the salt store. The Lisdillon salt works are the only salt works in eastern Australia known to have used such underfloor heating in the drying and storage area.

The salt-making process at Lisdillon.
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2. Windmill and channel

A windmill built on the rocks at this point was used to raise sea water which was then conveyed to the salt works via a channel cut into the slope. Remains of the channel can still be seen today. Radcliff's works were possibly the first salt works in Australia to use windmill technology.

3. Stone dwelling and store

This was a rectangular building which was divided into two, possibly three rooms. It was most likely used as living quarters for the workmen, with a store at the eastern end. If the salt works were operated all day and night, two men (salt boilers) would have been required to tend the fires, remove the salt and re-fill the pans.

4. Cottage

It is most likely that, during the life of the salt works, this cottage was used by the manager attending to works in the area. It was then leased out from the 1840s to the early 1900s before being abandoned and left to deteriorate. The Dodge family occupied the cottage for some thirty years from 1873. Recently, it has been extensively renovated by the current owner. The cottage is now located on private land and is not open to the general public.

5. Tank

This excavated area of 22 metres by 11 metres was most likely used as a reservoir to store fresh water for the occupants of the site and farm stock.