Our Latest News

Draft Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan

15/01/2015

The Tasmanian Government has today released a draft of the updated Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan.More

New sign celebrates the Overland Track experience

14/01/2015

In the 1960s, visitor information signs at Lake St Clair warned of no trapping, hunting, shooting, picking shrubs, cutting timber and grazing stock. Times have changed, with a new sign installation helping Overland Track walkers to celebrate their walk.More

Overland trek guide for young adventurers

14/01/2015

Of the 8000 people who tackle the world-famous Overland Track each year, almost one in ten is under 18 years old. A new publication from the Parks and Wildlife Service recognises that the experience is different for children.More

Eaglehawk Neck

Introduction

North View of Eaglehawk Neck

'North View of Eaglehawk Neck'
(Courtesy of George Brown Esq.)

The Eaglehawk Neck Historic Site offers visitors a unique perspective upon the security system which operated throughout the Tasman and Forestier Peninsulas during the convict period. The infamous dogline which ran across the Neck was devised to prevent the escape of prisoners from Port Arthur, while a semaphore station provided communication with the rest of the peninsula.

The system proved quite effective in achieving its purpose; however, it was not enough to prevent the escape of the infamous Martin Cash, who was to become one of Tasmania's best-known bushrangers.

Today, the only building which survives is the Officers' Quarters, erected in 1832. It is thought to be the oldest timber military building in Australia. The building has been restored and now acts as a museum and interpretation centre. Don't miss the opportunity to spend a little time in the Officer's Quarters to discover the remarkable history of the Eaglehawk Neck Historic Site.