Our Latest News

Join us for the Power of Parks forum at Launceston

22/07/2016

Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) in partnership with the University of Tasmania is exploring The Power of Parks through a series of UTAS public forums celebrating the benefits that parks and reserves provide to Tasmania's overall identify.More

Shipwreck identified as the Viola

19/07/2016

Timber samples from a ship wrecked on Tasmania's East Coast nearly 160 years ago have been identified as the Canadian-built brig Viola.More

Prosecution for Stanley penguin deaths

15/07/2016

The Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) and the Circular Head Council have conducted a joint investigation after 18 little penguins were found dead near a rookery in Stanley on the State's North-West coast last week.More

Eaglehawk Neck

Introduction

North View of Eaglehawk Neck

'North View of Eaglehawk Neck'
(Courtesy of George Brown Esq.)

The Eaglehawk Neck Historic Site offers visitors a unique perspective upon the security system which operated throughout the Tasman and Forestier Peninsulas during the convict period. The infamous dogline which ran across the Neck was devised to prevent the escape of prisoners from Port Arthur, while a semaphore station provided communication with the rest of the peninsula.

The system proved quite effective in achieving its purpose; however, it was not enough to prevent the escape of the infamous Martin Cash, who was to become one of Tasmania's best-known bushrangers.

Today, the only building which survives is the Officers' Quarters, erected in 1832. It is thought to be the oldest timber military building in Australia. The building has been restored and now acts as a museum and interpretation centre. Don't miss the opportunity to spend a little time in the Officer's Quarters to discover the remarkable history of the Eaglehawk Neck Historic Site.