Our Latest News

Visitor safety under the spotlight in new walker safety video

16/04/2018

Visitor safety in Tasmania's national parks and reserves has received a major investment with a suite of projects, including a new feature video on bushwalking preparation and safety.More

Draft Frenchmans Cap Recreation Zone Plan 2018

12/04/2018

The Parks and Wildlife Service has released the Draft Recreation Zone Plan 2018 for the Frenchmans Cap area.More

Redeveloped Lake Tahune Hut now open

12/04/2018

A locally designed and built, energy-efficient and sustainable hut is now welcoming bushwalkers at Lake Tahune on the Frenchmans Cap Track in the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.More

Maria Island National Park

Macropod Management

From the late 1960s a number of native animals were introduced to Maria Island to enhance the nature reserve experience  for visitors. The resident populations of Tasmanian pademelons and Bennett’s wallabies were increased and Forester kangaroos suffering habitat loss on the Tasmanian mainland were relocated to the island as a conservation measure.  All adapted well to their new environment. Managing the macropod populations on Maria Island is a challenge as they have no natural predators and their populations increase significantly when pasture is plentiful.

The Parks and Wildlife Service's objective in managing the macropod populations on Maria Island is to conserve the island’s natural systems and biodiversity while also ensuring a viable, healthy animal population. 

This is based on scientific monitoring of three main indicators: the condition of the island’s pastures; the population and health of the three macropod species (Forester kangaroos, Bennett’s wallaby and Tasmanian pademelon); current and predicted rainfall and therefore available food; and the predicted rate of population increase.

Further information is available in these documents:

 

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