Our Latest News

Upgraded Julius River bridges improve visitor access


Bridge upgrades at the Julius River Regional Reserve are now complete.More

Viewing platform upgrades for Rocky Cape's Aboriginal heritage sites


Two viewing platforms have been replaced as part of visitor facility improvements at Rocky Cape National Park on the North-West Coast. The platforms are at the Lee Archer Cave and South Cave sites, which have highly significant Aboriginal heritage values.More

Urban focus for World Wetlands Day


'Wetlands for a sustainable future' is the theme for World Wetlands Day 2018. This international celebration of the significance of wetland environments is held annually on 2 February.More

Toll House


In 1834 a company was formed to build the first bridge across the Derwent River. However, it wasn’t until 1840 that work got underway with Governor Franklin present to witness the first post being installed. Work was completed a year later.  The toll house was built at the same time, in order to collect charges from all using the bridge. The money went towards paying for its construction. 

Although the bridge has since been replaced, the original cottage still stands.  It is a one-storey, octagonal building and has been used for a variety of purposes over time.  Toll money was collected until 1874. Since then it has been vacant, used as a youth hostel, and is currently used as a centre for Tasmanian arts and crafts.  It was declared an historic site in 1961.


Toll House - early view showing the New Norfolk bridge