Our Latest News

Fuel reduction burns to protect remote World Heritage Wilderness


A number of large-scale fuel reduction burns will take place within remote areas of the Southwest, Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers and Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair national parks and the Southwest Conservation Area over the coming months.More

Southwest ecological burns important for orange-bellied parrot conservation


Planned ecological burns in Southwest National Park will help regenerate important habitat areas for the critically endangered orange-bellied parrot.More

Upgraded Julius River bridges improve visitor access


Bridge upgrades at the Julius River Regional Reserve are now complete.More

Mt Direction Historic Site


Mount Direction - the semaphore station at Launceston in 1844
The Mount Direction Semaphore Station was one of a number of stations set up in the Tamar Valley during the mid-nineteenth century. It provided a central link between the other stations which allowed communication to stretch from Launceston to George Town.  The Tamar Valley system is one of the earliest in Australia.

The Mount Direction site is particularly important as it is one of the only examples remaining; other stations in the Tamar system have been demolished or built over.  Mount Direction is the only site which still has its major parts in place, such as the old residence, out-buildings and walls.

Mount Direction Historic Site is important as an example of the communications system used in British military colonies during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  It was used for both government and maritime functions.  It is different from similar stations in southern Tasmania (such as Tasman peninsula) because of its well-built nearby house.