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Wineglass Bay - Notice to intending visitors

19/12/2014

Please note: This advice is provided to help avoid inconvenience to visitors intending to use the Wineglass Bay car park during the peak summer period from 26 December to 11 January.More

Ralph Falls track repair work under way

19/12/2014

The Parks and Wildlife Service has advised that works to repair and improve the visitor experience to Ralph Falls in the North-East, is under way.More

Discovery Ranger program explores parks and reserves

19/12/2014

Tasmanians are being encouraged to sample Tasmania's beautiful parks and reserves with the Discovery Ranger Program over the summer holidays.More

History of sealing at Macquarie Island

The End of Sealing

Wireless Station

Wireless Station, c. 1912
(Mitchell Library)

Stripping blubber from an elephant seal

The AAE Macquarie Island Party, 1911
(F. Hurley, Mitchell Library, State Library of NSW)

Digestors at Lusitania Bay

Digestors at Lusitania Bay

In 1911 Douglas Mawson's Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) stopped at Macquarie Island en route to Antarctica. A wireless repeater station was established at what is now known as Wireless Hill and a hut was built on the Isthmus for a party of five who were to remain on the island. The scientific group travelled extensively and left descriptions of many of the sealing sites where they often sheltered in the surviving huts.

The AAE party left the island in December 1913 to be replaced by the Commonwealth Meteorological Expedition. The station's records and one of the expedition members were lost in 1914 when the Commonwealth research vessel Endeavour disappeared without trace after leaving Macquarie Island. The meteorological station was finally abandoned in December 1915 when the party was taken off by the Rachel Cohen.

Following the visit of the AAE to Macquarie Island, Douglas Mawson headed a campaign to declare the island a nature reserve, and condemned the royal penguin industry in particular. Despite continued public denials by Hatch, he was finally forced, through the cancellation of his licence in February 1920 to cease operations at Macquarie Island where the last load of oil had been taken off in April of the previous year. Even without this cancellation, Hatch might not have been able to continue because of increasing financial difficulties which resulted in the liquidation of his company in April 1920.