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Call for bilingual rangers to welcome Asian visitors


After a successful trial last year, the Parks and Wildlife Service is increasing its intake of bilingual Discovery Rangers to help provide a quality experience for the increasing number of Asian visitors.More

Comment sought on altering the management plan for Tasman National Park


The State Government is seeking public opinion on the next step to make it easier for tourists and Tasmanians to access and enjoy our natural assets.More

East Coast Whale Trail opened


Whales and visitors to the East Coast will get closer together with a series of new whale viewing sites created between larapuna/Bay of Fires and the Tasman Peninsula.More

Bivouac Bay

4. Bivouac Bay

time 3 hour return walk (5km one way)
access Arthur Highway (A9) to junction with Fortescue Bay road (C344) which is 4km south of Taranna and 4km north of Port Arthur. Turn into C344 and drive 12km to Fortescue Bay. (This road is unsealed but is suitable for 2WD vehicles and mountain bikes.) See map
fees Park entry fees apply.
facilities Camping, boat ramp, drinking water, picnic and toilet facilities available at Fortescue Bay.
grade Level 3.
what to take Group B items
cautions Supervise children, unpatrolled beach, unprotected track edges
prohibited No pets, firearms or bicycles

Here in the Tasman National Park you can enjoy a coastline, remote from roads and houses without walking a long distance or climbing steep hills. The walk leaves from the squeaky white sands of Fortescue Bay and gives you close-up views of sparkling waters and large kelp forests. You might see a seal or dolphins!


Wreck of the William Pitt
Photo by Steve Johnson

The William Pitt (43º 07' 37.54"  147º 57' 23.27")
About halfway along the track you will come to Canoe Bay, where the remains of a shipwreck can be clearly seen above the waterline. Built in the UK in 1904, the ship was a steam hopper barge named Andre Reboulas,  later sold to the Dutch.

In 1907 she was renamed William Pitt and sold in Melbourne. She came to Hobart in 1940 for use in the construction of the floating Arch Bridge across the Derwent River. She was later scuttled in 1955 to act as a breakwater for small craft in Canoe Bay.

The Candle Stick and Totem Pole (43º 08' 21"  148º 00' 22")
Horizontally bedded Permian (marine) and Triassic (non-marine) sediments intruded by Jurassic dolerite dominate the Tasman peninsula. The action of the sea has produced a cliffed coastline with many erosion features noted for their grandeur. Nestled in a narrow chasm between the Lanterns at Cape Hauy,  two such features, the dolerite towers of the "Candlestick" and the "Totem Pole" at Cape Hauy, are able to be seen across Fortescue Bay from the track leading to Bivouac Bay. See the Cape Hauy Great Short Walk for details.