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Call for bilingual rangers to welcome Asian visitors


After a successful trial last year, the Parks and Wildlife Service is increasing its intake of bilingual Discovery Rangers to help provide a quality experience for the increasing number of Asian visitors.More

Comment sought on altering the management plan for Tasman National Park


The State Government is seeking public opinion on the next step to make it easier for tourists and Tasmanians to access and enjoy our natural assets.More

East Coast Whale Trail opened


Whales and visitors to the East Coast will get closer together with a series of new whale viewing sites created between larapuna/Bay of Fires and the Tasman Peninsula.More

Pandani Grove

17. Pandani Grove

time 30- 40 minute circuit (1.5km circuit)
From New Norfolk take road B62 and then B61.  If travelling from Lake St Clair, take road B61 from the Lyell Highway (A10), just east of Gretna. Once at the park, continue up the Lake Dobson Road for 16km. This section of road is unsealed and can be closed due to snow. See map
fees Park entry fees apply.
facilities Toilets and day shelter near walk start at Lake Dobson. Electric barbecues, visitor centre and restaurant located at the park entrance.
grade Level 2. The track has no steep sections, but ice and snow can cover sections of track.
what to take Group A items
cautions Supervise children , tracks subject to severe weather conditions all year round, weather may change quickly, tracks are difficult to navigate when covered in snow and may be impassable
prohibited No pets, firearms or bicycles

Named after the world's tallest heath - the pandani - this walk circuits Lake Dobson in the Mt Field National Park. In fine weather, it’s suitable for all the family.


The remarkable pandani is just one of many subalpine plants that are found in Tasmania and nowhere else on Earth. Along the walk you will encounter numerous alpine plants. Indeed, Mt Field is unusual in that the diversity of plants in the upper reaches of the mountain is greater than the diversity of plants in the forests at the base of the mountain. 

At the far end of the lake, you will enter a stunning patch of forest dominated by a mixture of pandanis and pencil pines. Pencil pines are one of a number of ancient conifers that are endemic to Tasmania.

Platypuses are occasionally seen in Lake Dobson, particularly at dusk and dawn.