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Harnessing the power of social media to promote Tasmania to the world

16/04/2015

An iconic Tasmanian attraction is being promoted to the world every day through the eyes of visitors in an innovative pilot project using social media.More

Community protection fuel reduction burns continue

13/04/2015

This past week saw the Parks and Wildlife Service complete another four asset protection burns to provide protection for communities around the State, with another burn going ahead today.More

Granite Creek bridge improves off-road safety

02/04/2015

A new bridge at Granite Creek on the Climies Track, linking Trial Harbour and Granville Harbour, will improve safety for mountain bike riders, bushwalkers and four-wheel drive enthusiasts.
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Grey Goshawk, Accipiter novaehollandiae

Grey Goshawk Grey Goshawk
(Photograph by Peter Tonelli)
The Grey Goshawk is a medium-sized bird of prey (350-550mm). In Tasmania, the bird, despite its name, is all white - the only all-white raptor (bird of prey) in the world. On the mainland, two colour forms occur - all white and grey. The legs and feet, and the cere (just behind the bill), are yellow. At a distance, the grey goshawk can be confused with the sulphur-crested cockatoo. Females are larger than males.

Juveniles in their first year have olive-yellow eyes which go orange in their second year and then red when mature.

Habitat

Occurs singularly or in pairs in rainforest, wet sclerophyll forest and woodland.

Diet

Grey Goshawks feed on birds, small mammals, reptiles and insects. They pursue prey in flight, striking with powerful talons. They will ambush birds.

Breeding

Breeding is restricted to wet forest (especially blackwoods), although juveniles can be seen in a variety of habitats. The nest is large and built of sticks and lined with leaves high in a tree fork. Two to three eggs are laid. The same nest is often used from year to year. The female does most of the incubation, though the male relieves her when she needs to feed. The male catches most of the food for the young.

Call

The call is a shrill, high-pitched chatter, and also a musical "kuik, kuik, kuik". (Audio recordings courtesy of David Stewart/Nature Sound).

Distribution

Distribution Map courtesy Natural Values Atlas, data from theLIST
© 2010 State of Tasmania
The Grey Goshawk is uncommon to rare through eastern and northern Australia in suitable forested habitat. It also occurs in New Guinea and Indonesia. The white colour phase is found in the Kimberly, coastal Victoria and Tasmania.

In Tasmania, the species is found in forested areas throughout the State, although it is most commonly seen in the northwest.